advertisement
Home » Ask the Therapist » Psychopathy

Psychopathy

Asked by on with 1 answer:

Since I was 4 I had an obsession with serial killers and psychopaths but I always find a justification of why they did it and seeing people I pain,I also am a pathological liar and I manipulate others to get what I want it for pure enjoyment as I get bored very easily,I’m not concerned about any if this it’s very useful…was also abused as a child and have a history of killing a few of our pets and I’ve been diagnosed with very high levels of aggression when I was 4 and been taken to multiple doctors because my mom would be scared of me,I feel no empathy but I do feel emotion just when it’s related to me if it doesnt concern me then it doesnt bother me. Emotions just cause people to get wrapped around your pinky just depending on you and are so lost without you.ive also been told that when I glare at someone they get the chills and are frightened by me.my other problem is I have no long term goals and I do impulsive things just to get that tiny bit of excitement I usually don’t with anything. My parents are also worried I will end up in jail because I turn to stealing and reckless driving and dint feel shame or remorse for it but I’m good at doing it so I won’t get caught so shes just overreacting. I also mimic other people and i act different around different people to get along with them and so i can later manipulate them into doing things for me.like playing different characters.i lost a few family members I was close to but they deserved it they would never give me any money but they had it at least this way I got everything they had.also i didnt sleep more than 4 hours last 2 years because I get bad nightmares about running in snow into nithing and its reoccurring so I wake up tired because snow makes me really tired and I started hallucinating just auditory hallucinations so it’s okay they can be kinda fun and I hysterically laugh without being able to stop it and it scared people because my voice is serious but I’m laughing uncontrollably.

Psychopathy

Answered by on -

A.

It is not clear what you’re asking. Based on the symptoms that you have described, psychopathy may be a possibility but if you’re under the age of 18, you may fall more in line with conduct disorder. Without interviewing you professionally, it’s difficult to know what might be wrong.

Your letter also seems to read like a laundry list of psychopathy symptoms. It’s not clear if what you have described are your actual symptoms, or if you are using the clinical or diagnostic language of psychopathy to characterize your symptoms. More descriptive, and less clinical, is always better.

A few elements of your article are particularly concerning. One is the fact that you have killed family pets. That is never okay. That is always a red flag. In fact, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), America’s principal law enforcement agency, has recategorized animal abuse as a felony crime. They have increased the penalties because they understand that people who hurt animals might also hurt people. They recognize animal cruelty for the violent crime that it is.

You mentioned having been abused. It’s possible that the abuse explains your disposition. You didn’t say who abused you but, statistically speaking, it’s usually someone you know, like a parent or a stepparent. In fact, studies show that the majority of child abusers are parents or their unmarried partners. In the case of unmarried partners, there are even occasions when a child has gone to their parent to report the abuse and then are not believed. That is an ultimately helpless feeling. Sometimes people who have been abused will take their hurt feelings out on others as a way to feel some level of control. Perhaps that is what you are doing. If true, you can and should receive help for this.

Another concerning aspect of your letter is your auditory hallucinations. It’s possible that this is a sign of mental illness. It’s also possible that it’s a side effect from your lack of sleep. Generally speaking, most people need eight to ten hours of sleep a night and more for adolescents. If you’re only getting four hours, it’s possible that you’re experiencing the side effects of sleep deprivation. Study show that there is an increased frequency of auditory hallucinations and delusions associated with prolonged loss of sleep. It’s not clear if what you have described is a side effect of your lack of sleep but it is a possibility. It would be advisable for you to consult a physician about your auditory hallucinations and also to determine why you only sleep four hours a night. This is not the norm and should be evaluated.

It is not good to be “obsessed” with anything and that is especially true for serial killers and psychopaths. They are people who are willing to hurt others for their own personal gain. These are not good people. Some might even call them evil.

If you are “obsessed,” then it would be in your best interest to seek help. Obsession would suggest something beyond your control. Whenever someone feels unable to control their behavior, it’s a sign of a problem. The risk is that they will lose control and do something bad.

If you’d like to write back to ask more specific question, please don’t hesitate to do so. I will try to answer any question you may have. Please take care.

Dr. Kristina Randle

Psychopathy

Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW

Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist and Assistant Professor of Social Work and Forensics with extensive experience in the field of mental health. She works in private practice with adults, adolescents and families. Kristina has worked in a large array of settings including community mental health, college counseling and university research centers.

APA Reference
Randle, K. (2019). Psychopathy. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 5, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2019/11/13/psychopathy/
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 Nov 2019 (Originally: 13 Nov 2019)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 11 Nov 2019
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.