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Need a Diagnosis

Asked by on with 1 answer:

I truly believe that I have high functioning autism. I have a lot of the symptoms, if not all of them. I have taken multiple online tests and they all say that I do have autism. The only problem is, is that my mother will not take me to get tested. I need a diagnosis, but I do not know how to get one without my mother. What do I do?

Need a Diagnosis

Answered by on -

A.

I admire your desire to understand what it is that you are struggling with and finding ways to cope with a mental health concern that involves impairment in social interactions with others.

Autism has been identified as a spectrum disorder, meaning that the range of symptoms can be at level one, as you are identifying, high functioning autism. Level two autism and level three, which is severe. In level three individuals require substantial support in coping with life because they struggle a great deal with communication and social interaction. Often there is a type of rigidity that prevents adequate coping with changes, and highly repetitive behaviors interfere with normal functioning.

In level two autism individuals need substantial support and clear deficits in social interactions. Typically there is great difficulty coping with changes as well, and there is also an inflexibility and repetitive behaviors.

Finally, in high functioning autism individuals need some support and benefit from learning how to initiate social interactions. The inflexibility with behavior shows up when there is difficulty switching activities and there are problems with organization.

To take a test PsychCentral’s test on autism go here and another one here which includes information on what would have been called Asperger’s (now high function autism.)

In order for you to move forward, since you identify yourself as being in the 9th grade and 15 years old, I would take the results of the quizzes and set up an appointment with you school guidance counselor, of a trusted teacher. Ask to have a meeting and explain there is something important you need to discuss.

Show the results of your quiz and this response. Explain how it is that your issues align with these results, and be prepared with specific examples from the classroom, and other social encounters. In other words, if your mother won’t argue your case bring it directly to the individuals at school. You mom may have many reasons for her position, as it may require testing, classification, and other interventions that she may be opposed to. What you would be asking for from the counselor are direct ways to help. I imagine that there are socialization groups that might be helpful in giving you strategies for developing more social interaction skills.

Please write us back and let us know how you made out!

Wishing you patience and peace,
Dr. Dan
Proof Positive Blog @ PsychCentral

Need a Diagnosis

Daniel J. Tomasulo, PhD, TEP, MFA, MAPP

Dan Tomasulo Ph.D., TEP, MFA, MAPP teaches Positive Psychology in the graduate program of Counseling and Clinical Psychology at Columbia University, Teachers College and works with Martin Seligman, the Father of Positive Psychology in the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) program at the University of Pennsylvania. He is Director of the New York Certification in Positive Psychology for the Open Center in New York City and on faculty at New Jersey City University. Sharecare has honored him as one of the top 10 online influencers on the topic of depression. For more information go to: http://www.dare2behappy.com/. He also writes for Psych Central's Ask the Therapist column and the Proof Positive blog.

APA Reference
Tomasulo, D. (2019). Need a Diagnosis. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 22, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2019/06/16/need-a-diagnosis/
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 14 Jun 2019 (Originally: 16 Jun 2019)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 14 Jun 2019
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.