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Imaginary Friend that Is Real

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Hi have lots of problems in my life, Since my divorce I’ve been hearing voices for 11 years and sometimes getting to this stage where I don’t know if I’m a sleep or not and scary things happen, but my problem is I have this friend that no one else can see but me and we talk a lot and I see him and feel him. He helps me from my other voices that most of the day tell me that I’m just stupid and I should end my life, (I had over 10 suicide attempts). Last one was about 6 weeks ago. But My Imaginary friend name is Mike and mike lately want me to stop eating and sleeping, I have not sleept for over 10 days. Me and him talk all night and day and no one knows about my problems, My parents don’t understand and i’ve never told my doctor, Im thinking that with my mental thing going on i might not live longer like this, everyday is a battle to for me to stay alive. I don’t want mike to go away cause he is my best friend but i think he is trying to kill me and he is doing a damn good job, I need help.

Imaginary Friend that Is Real

Answered by on -

A.

I’m sorry for what you have been experiencing. It is difficult and frightening but it’s important to realize that you’re making a mistake by not reporting your symptoms to your doctor. When you withhold important information, from people in a position to help you, you hinder their ability to effectively provide treatment.

This problem is likely exacerbated by your sleep deprivation. Studies show that even losing one night’s sleep could lead someone to experience psychotic-like symptoms. Having many night’s of sleep loss could amplify this psychotic-like experience. If your doctor knew about your sleep problems, he or she could prescribe a medication that could stabilize your sleep cycle. Once your sleep is better regulated, your other symptoms could be treated accordingly.

I strongly encourage you to report these symptoms to your doctor. If you feel as though you might harm yourself, do not hesitate to go to the hospital or to call 911. I hope that you will take my advice. Please take care.

Dr. Kristina Randle

Imaginary Friend that Is Real

Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW

Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist and Assistant Professor of Social Work and Forensics with extensive experience in the field of mental health. She works in private practice with adults, adolescents and families. Kristina has worked in a large array of settings including community mental health, college counseling and university research centers.

APA Reference
Randle, K. (2018). Imaginary Friend that Is Real. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 26, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2014/09/26/imaginary-friend-that-is-real/
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 8 May 2018
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 8 May 2018
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.