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 Thursday, May 18, 2000

lifescape.com recently relaunched its site, less than 6 months after its initial launch, never a good sign. In fact, lifescape.com, which appears to be majority owned by the nation's largest behavioral healthcare company, is trying to distance itself from its parent company, ValueOptions. "FHC Internet Services is affiliated with FHC Health Systems, a leading behavioral healthcare company which serves over 22 million people across the country." Yes, but what is not mentioned is that FHC Health Systems is better known as ValueOptions. What's wrong with this picture??! When was the last time you heard of a managed care company looking out for you?? And for your best treatment options?? Blah. Makes me sick how they don't openly disclose their sponsorship and a perfect example of how the Web bastardizes relationships.


(Posted at 09:58:33 PM EDT.)

Welcome Back!!!!!!!
We're back..... We were moving our servers from the old MHN site to a new ISP, as MHN moved up the date of getting us off of their hardware. Everything seems to be functioning, but please drop us a line if you find something not working. Thanks!

(Posted at 11:58:47 AM EDT.)

 Monday, May 15, 2000

Hindsight bias -- not just a convenient memory enhancer but an important part of an efficient memory system
"It is said that hindsight is 20-20. According to new research, hindsight bias -- the way our impression of how we acted or would have acted changes when we learn the outcome of an event -- is actually a by-product of a cognitive mechanism that allows us to unclutter our minds by discarding inaccurate information and embracing that which is correct." Cool!

(Posted at 12:06:49 PM EDT.)

Higher dose of electroconvulsive therapy works better to relieve depression
"More powerful shocks of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) speed relief of depression, researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and two other centers report in the May 15 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry. At the same time, the larger shocks increase temporary loss of memory -- even for autobiographical facts." Yes, and even higher doses will remove any remnant of the depression, the individual's personality, and other nagging problems (such as free will) which may continue to exist. This is very disturbing. What's more important? Your memory or your mood??

(Posted at 12:05:21 PM EDT.)

Media May Play Role in Copycat Suicides
Under the As Though We Didn't Know department, "``Imitating a suicide appears to be more likely if a news story provides details on methods, minimizes the influence of mental illnesses, and portrays the victim in heroic or romantic terms,'' Gould added in a telephone interview with Reuters Health." Read the whole article on Yahoo! News.

(Posted at 12:01:52 PM EDT.)

 Saturday, May 13, 2000

Love Bug Latest: Suspect, Student, Hero?
Also from the Media Grok column, "Like a complicated play, the Love Bug story is beginning to sort itself out. In contrast to the confusion that wafted out of much of the coverage earlier in the week, yesterday's reporting on the appearance of suspect Onel de Guzman was consistent, comprehensive and, at times, rather colorful.

De Guzman, 23, a Filipino college student, showed up at a Manila news conference and mumbled that "it was possible" he accidentally created the virus that crippled computers worldwide last week, numerous outlets reported. (They also unfailingly mentioned that he hid behind dark sunglasses.)

He really didn't say much too much else -- he didn't know who released or wrote the virus, and doesn't remember what he was doing the day the virus erupted. But his terse answers, translated by lawyer Rolando Quimbo, "seemed to fill in much of the puzzle investigators have grappled with," the Associated Press reported."

I think the most important thing we learned from this virus is how susceptible Microsoft's operating systems are to these things. If a student in some far away country could "accidentally" release a virus that could cause so much damage in so little time, imagine what a highly-skilled, dedicated hacker could do if he or she wanted to! Why did the virus propegate so easily and quickly?? Because Microsoft's operating system just assumes that if you receive a snippet of programming code over the Internet and run it, you know what you're doing. Most people simply don't know the difference between different types of email attachments and what harm they could bring to the user.
(Posted at 12:29:38 PM EDT.)

More Findings from the Pew Study
From The Industry Standard's Media Grok, "The New York Times was the only outlet that spent space comparing and contrasting the two studies. The Pew study queried people on the quality of their online communications, while the Stanford study instead focused on how much time people spent on different activities, including being online. "The different conclusions of the studies could signal the beginning of a stream of seemingly contradictory studies about the Internet," the Times' Rebecca Fairley Raney concludes.

Other outlets were happy to chew on more findings from this week's study, including the revelation that more than 9 million women joined the ranks of Internet users in the last six months. And, wonder of wonders, USA Today noted the study's finding that more women reported playing online games (37 percent vs. 32 percent of men), and more men (80 percent vs. 67 percent of women) reported shopping online." Excellent.
(Posted at 12:24:36 PM EDT.)

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 13 Jul 2007
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~ Albert Einstein
 
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