Trauma News

Half of Parents of Child Stroke Victims Have PTSD Symptoms

February 16th, 2015
Over half of all parents whose children have suffered from a stroke show symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2015. Researchers also found that about one-fourth of children who have experienced ...

Study of Retired NFL Players Shows Concussion-Related Brain Damage

February 5th, 2015
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have discovered signs of accumulated brain damage in former NFL players that may be connected to specific memory problems experienced decades after they stopped playing football. The study involved nine former NFL players who underwent a variety of imaging and ...

Religion Can Help Women Cope With Sexual Assault

February 5th, 2015
Many college women who have been sexually abused not only fear their attackers or those similar to them, but often have trouble trusting anyone after being assaulted. A new Baylor University study suggests religion can help victims cope with the emotional fallout. The study is published ...

Insomnia Therapy Can Reduce Suicidal Thoughts in Veterans

February 3rd, 2015
A new study highlights the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy targeting insomnia among veterans. Research findings show that suicidal ideation decreased by 33 percent after a maximum of six sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Moreover, in addition to improving insomnia and ...

Economic Benefits from Team Hospital Care for Violence

January 28th, 2015
A new model of clinical care incorporates a team-based public health approach to care for and manage violent injuries. The innovative strategy which empowers health care professionals to prevent violent events, not just treat them, is used in more than 25 hospitals across ...

‘Honeycomb’ Brain Damage Afflicts Some Vets Who Survive Blasts

January 26th, 2015
Researchers have discovered honeycomb-shaped patterns of broken and swollen nerve fibers in the brains of some veterans who survived an improvised explosive device (IED), according to a new study at Johns Hopkins University. These hidden brain injuries may be the physical evidence behind ...

Two Genes May Boost Risk for PTSD

January 13th, 2015
Researchers have linked two gene variants to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The findings, published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, may help explain why some people develop PTSD after a traumatic experience while others do not. "Many people suffer with ...

Fear of Terrorism May Lead to Job Burnout

January 11th, 2015
A new study has found a link between the fear of terrorism and an increased incidence of job burnout over time. The study, led by Dr. Sharon Toker of Tel Aviv University’s Faculty of Management, examines how the fear of terrorism can lead ...

Circumcision Linked to Increased Risk of Autism

January 10th, 2015
New research has found that circumcised boys are more likely than intact boys to develop autism spectrum disorder (ASD) before the age of 10. The risk is particularly high for infantile autism before the age of five, according to researchers in Copenhagen. The study, ...

Strong Personality Traits Protect Police from PTSD

January 7th, 2015
A new study suggests personal traits such as resilience, satisfaction with life and a grateful disposition may help safeguard police officers from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although exposure to traumatic events has been found to trigger PTSD, the personal traits appear to ...