PTSD News

Prolonged Negative Thinking May Increase Alzheimer’s Risk

November 18th, 2014
Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) may increase a person's risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King’s College London. In Alzheimer’s disease, brain cells begin to degenerate and die, causing severe problems with memory ...

Are Community Mental Providers Ready for Military Veterans?

November 14th, 2014
A new RAND Corporation study finds that most community-based mental health providers are not well prepared to take care of the special needs of military veterans and their families. The report was commissioned by United Health Foundation in collaboration with the Military Officers ...

Brain’s Threat Response Calmed by Seeing Love & Support

November 10th, 2014
New research suggests that being reminded of being loved and cared for can reduce the brain's hypervigilant response to stress. University of Exeter (U.K.) investigators found that observing pictures of others being loved and cared for reduces the brain's response to threat. The findings ...

Pregnant Women with PTSD More Prone to Premature Birth

November 9th, 2014
Pregnant women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at an increased risk of giving birth prematurely, according to a new study. The study, which examined more than 16,000 births to female veterans, found that having PTSD in the year before delivery increased a ...

Waking While Under General Anesthetic Can Trigger Problems Later

October 27th, 2014
A recent study of people who have been accidentally conscious while under a general anesthetic shows it can have a long-term impact. The patient remains conscious in about one in every 19,000 general anesthetics, said researchers led by Dr. Jaideep Pandit of Oxford ...

Army Enlistees Similar to Civilians But Some Disorders More Prevalent

October 27th, 2014
Emerging research suggests that while military enrollees do not share the exact psychological profile as socio-demographically comparable civilians, they are more similar than previously thought. One study found that new soldiers and matched civilians are equally likely to have experienced at least one ...

Nerve Block Eases Worst PTSD in Vets

October 13th, 2014
A small pilot study demonstrated that a common anesthetic procedure significantly helped veterans suffering from chronic, extreme post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting, researchers followed 12 patients with PTSD who had undergone a simple anesthetic procedure called ...

For Kids, Mental Abuse Can Be Worse than Sexual, Physical Abuse

October 9th, 2014
Although childhood emotional abuse is rarely addressed by clinicians, new research suggests psychological abuse among children may lead to more problems than sexual or physical abuse. The finding that childhood emotional abuse and neglect is rarely addressed in prevention programs or in treatment ...

Mini-Stroke May Lead to PTSD

October 4th, 2014
Nearly one-third of patients who suffer a mini-stroke, also known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA), develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Those with PTSD were also more likely to experience depression, anxiety, and lower quality of life, according to researchers at ...

U.S. Military Lessens Stigma of Mental Illness, Promotes Treatment

October 1st, 2014
An independent study by the RAND Corporation discovers the U.S. Department of Defense has made progress in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help for mental illness. Nevertheless, although the culture surrounding conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder has improved, researchers ...