Psychology News

Teen ‘Pharming’ Is a Rising Concern

January 28th, 2015
A new review suggests new initiatives are needed to address the rise of “pharming,” or recreational use and abuse of prescription drugs, among teenagers. Teens often believe the drugs are harmless with the abuse of prescription medications now the second-most commonly abused drug ...

Mindfulness Can Boost Kids’ Math Scores, Kindness, Likability

January 28th, 2015
A new social and emotional program with mindfulness techniques, called MindUp, has been shown to successfully help children become more caring and optimistic, improve their math scores and lower their stress levels. The program, founded by Oscar-winning actress Goldie Hawn, was recently ...

Culture Influences Creativity

January 28th, 2015
A new study examines if a nation’s culture would influence the expression of creativity or the quality of the new output. Investigators compared nearly 300 individuals from Taiwan, a collectivist society, and Canada, a more individualistic country. Researchers from Canada’s Concordia University discovered that ...

Economic Benefits from Team Hospital Care for Violence

January 28th, 2015
A new model of clinical care incorporates a team-based public health approach to care for and manage violent injuries. The innovative strategy which empowers health care professionals to prevent violent events, not just treat them, is used in more than 25 hospitals across ...

Sleep Rules and Routine Improve Kids’ Slumber

January 27th, 2015
New research finds household rules and regular sleep-wake routines help kids get better and more age-appropriate sleep. Pennsylvania State researchers found that well-established rules for getting good sleep, such as limited caffeine and a regular bedtime, led to sufficient sleep quantity and adequate sleep ...

Autistic Kids Have Different Brain Activity during Play

January 27th, 2015
A first of its-kind-study shows that brain activation patterns and stress levels in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are significantly different as compared with typically developing children. Researchers from Vanderbilt University examined social play exchanges on multiple levels, revealing associations among brain ...

Management Strategies Reduce Mental Health Stigma

January 27th, 2015
A new Canadian survey finds that nearly 40 percent of workers would not tell their managers that they have a mental health problem. However, approximately half of those surveyed report they would help a coworker if the worker has a mental health ...

Some Common Drugs May Increase Dementia Risk

January 27th, 2015
A large study finds that a certain group of medications may increase the risk for developing dementia, including Alzheimer’s. Researchers discovered medications that have strong anticholinergic effects may increase the risk for dementia if the drugs are taken at higher doses or for ...

Reducing Work-Family Conflicts Improves Employees’ Sleep

January 27th, 2015
Workers who took part in an intervention designed to reduce conflicts between their work schedules and their family lives got an extra hour of sleep each week and reported greater sleep satisfaction than workers who did not participate, according to a new ...

For Some Parents, Kids Are College-Bound From Day One

January 26th, 2015
New research suggests parents’ beliefs that a child will attend college is strongly associated with academic success beginning in prekindergarten. Studies have shown that success in kindergarten is often associated with a number of socioeconomic factors. Children whose parents are more educated and ...