Neuropsychology and Neurology News

Weight Loss Surgery for Obesity May Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s

August 30th, 2014
Weight loss surgery can actually benefit the brain, according to a new study. In fact, researchers theorize that bariatric surgery could help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s in obese people. Past research how shown that obese people face a 35 percent higher risk ...

Your Brain Judges Trustworthiness Before You Know It

August 30th, 2014
Your brain makes a spontaneous judgment of whether or not another person’s face is trustworthy before you are even conscious of it, according to new research published in the Journal of Neuroscience. “Our findings suggest that the brain automatically responds to a face’s ...

Magnetic Electrical Current Boosts Memory

August 29th, 2014
External stimulation of the brain with electrical current using magnetic pulses has been found to improve memory. Researchers from Northwestern Medicine believe the discovery may signal a new method to treat memory impairments associated with diseases such as stroke, early Alzheimer’s disease, cardiac ...

Imaging Studies Distinguish Imagination from Memory

August 29th, 2014
In a new study, Brigham Young University researchers explore where and how imagination happens in the brain. Graduate student researcher Stefania Ashby and her faculty mentor developed a methodology that incorporated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology in a series of experiments that helped ...

Mice Study Suggests Lack of Serotonin Not Behind Depression

August 28th, 2014
New evidence challenges the conventional wisdom that the brain chemical serotonin is responsible for maintaining mood balance, and that a deficit of serotonin leads to depression. In a study, scientists report that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains did not ...

Depression in Young Adults Tied to Hyper-Connected Brain Networks

August 28th, 2014
Imaging studies of the brain show that young adults who have suffered from depression in the past seem to have hyper-connected emotional and cognitive networks, which may lead to reduced cognitive control, and negative rumination. University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) researchers believe the discovery ...

Mindfulness Can Aid Those In Early Dementia and Caregivers

August 27th, 2014
An innovative new approach combines mindfulness training for those with early-stage dementia and their caregivers during the same class session. The new report suggests the two-for-one approach is mutually beneficial as both groups reported less depression and improved sleep and quality of life. "The ...

Confusion On Awakening Called New Sleep Disorder

August 27th, 2014
A new study suggests a disorder called "sleep drunkenness" may affect one in every seven people. Sleep drunkenness occurs when, during or following arousals from sleep, peoples are confused or perform inappropriate behavior, such as answering the phone instead of turning off the alarm. ...

Why Sleep Breaks Down With Age

August 23rd, 2014
As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. On top of that, they tend to awaken too early in the morning. A new study from researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston and the University ...

In Autism, Poor ‘Pruning’ of Neurons Leads to Excess Synapses

August 23rd, 2014
Children and teens with autism have a sluggish brain “pruning” process during development compared to healthy kids, according to neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). This slower pruning process results in a surplus of brain synapses -- the points where neurons ...