Memory and Perception News

For Some Parents, Kids Are College-Bound From Day One

January 26th, 2015
New research suggests parents’ beliefs that a child will attend college is strongly associated with academic success beginning in prekindergarten. Studies have shown that success in kindergarten is often associated with a number of socioeconomic factors. Children whose parents are more educated and ...

Fruit Fly Study Suggests All-Nighters Hamper Memory

January 26th, 2015
Researchers have associated sleep deprivation to problems with memory and learning for several years. Most animals, from flies to humans, have trouble remembering when sleep deprived, and studies have shown that sleep is critical in converting short-term into long-term memory, a process known ...

‘Honeycomb’ Brain Damage Afflicts Some Vets Who Survive Blasts

January 26th, 2015
Researchers have discovered honeycomb-shaped patterns of broken and swollen nerve fibers in the brains of some veterans who survived an improvised explosive device (IED), according to a new study at Johns Hopkins University. These hidden brain injuries may be the physical evidence behind ...

Mouse Study Complicates Role of Inflammation in Alzheimer’s

January 26th, 2015
The role of inflammation in the development of Alzheimer’s disease just got more complicated. University of Florida (UF) researchers discovered an anti-inflammatory process might actually facilitate the build-up of sticky clumps of protein that form plaques in the brain. These plaques block brain cells' ...

When Do We Turn to Superstition and Charms?

January 25th, 2015
Many people seem to have a lucky charm, maybe a lucky pair of socks or a piece of jewelry. New research shows that we are more likely to turn to superstitions or a lucky charm to achieve a performance goal rather than a ...

New Research Finds Memory More Selective Than Previously Thought

January 25th, 2015
New research shows that people may have to “turn on” or prompt their memories to help them remember even the simplest details. Findings from the Pennsylvania State study indicate that memory is far more selective than previously thought, according to researchers. "It is commonly ...

Lucid Dreamers are More Self-Reflective

January 25th, 2015
A new study has discovered that the area of the brain that enables self-reflection is larger in lucid dreamers — those people who can control their dreams. According to researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin and the Max Planck ...

How The Mundane Can Become Meaningful — And Remembered

January 24th, 2015
It’s no surprise that memories of highly emotional events, such as the birth of a child, are strong. But a new study shows that these meaningful events can actually strengthen older, more mundane memories. "We're continuously monitoring our environment, and, in the process, ...

Meditation Shown to Alter Gray Matter in Brain

January 24th, 2015
Meditating for just eight weeks has been shown to alter the brain’s gray matter, which may be at least part of the reason why practitioners experience significant improvements in memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress, according to a new study led ...

Painkiller Addiction Up Risk of Birth Defects

January 23rd, 2015
As painkiller (opioid) abuse permeates our country, many are unaware that medications such as codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, or morphine may increase the risk for serious birth defects. Prescription opioid-based medications are used to treat severe pain and are easily abused. Their use may ...