Genetics News

Parenting Style May Worsen Toddler Aggression

December 10th, 2014
A new study dispels the theory that toddler aggression is associated with frustration caused by language problems. University of Montreal researchers now believe parental behavior may play a factor in the link between verbal frustrations and aggression. Physical aggression in toddlers includes frequent hitting, ...

Mice Study Suggests Cancer Drug May Combat Fragile X Autism

December 1st, 2014
New research suggests people affected by a common inherited form of autism may be helped by a drug that is being tested as a treatment for cancer. The most common genetic cause of autism spectrum disorders is Fragile X Syndrome, a condition that ...

Vulnerable Brain Spot Tied to Schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s

November 28th, 2014
Oxford researchers have discovered a specific network in the brain that is the first to degenerate with age and also the most vulnerable spot for the development of schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy ...

Rat Study Suggests Schizophrenia May Stem from Surplus Brain Protein

November 25th, 2014
New research discovers a gene associated with schizophrenia also plays a role in brain development. The finding may help to explain the way the disease originates. Bonnie Firestein, Ph.D., a Rutgers professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, says too much ...

New Hope for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia

November 8th, 2014
Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine have discovered a genetic biomarker that could help identify schizophrenia patients who are resistant to antipsychotic drugs (about 30 percent of all schizophrenia patients). “Many treatment-resistant patients are not identified as such and are treated ...

Bipolar Disorder May Hike Risk of Premature Birth

November 4th, 2014
New research suggests women who have been hospitalized for bipolar disorder are nearly twice as likely to have premature babies compared to women without a history of mental illness. Investigators from Women's College Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), both ...

Parenting Style Probably Does Not Raise IQ in Children

October 31st, 2014
The ability to improve intelligence by environmental manipulation remains a subject of considerable debate. New research explores if a parents interactions with their child can help boost the child’s intelligence. For example, does reading bedtime stories, engaging in ...

Seeing ADHD On A Spectrum, Not A Disease Category

October 16th, 2014
A new study suggests that there is a natural spectrum of attention function in the general population, with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at one extreme. Accordingly, a genetic analysis may be able to predict children who will be a high risk for ADHD. If ...

Mouse Study: Oxytocin Regulates Female Sexual Behavior

October 11th, 2014
The "cuddle" hormone oxytocin may play a particularly strong role in regulating female sexual behavior, according to a new mouse study by scientists at Rockefeller University. Oxytocin is released naturally during moments of relational bonding, such as breastfeeding, childbirth, and sex. The research, ...

Down Syndrome Study Sheds Light on Alzheimer’s

September 22nd, 2014
New research suggests the quest to understand the mechanism by which Alzheimer’s disease impacts memory and cognition may be more complicated than previously understood. University of Wisconsin researchers, including lead study author Sigan Hartley, Ph.D., and Brad Christian, Ph.D., looked at the role of ...