Cognition News

Youngest Bone Marrow Transplant Patients at Highest Risk of Cognitive Decline

December 14th, 2014
Toddlers who undergo total body irradiation in preparation for a bone marrow transplant are at higher risk for a decline in IQ, according to a new study. Researchers at  St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital tracked the IQ scores of 170 St. Jude patients ...

Memory Lapses Among Well-Educated May Signal Stroke Risk

December 13th, 2014
People with a high level of education who complain about memory lapses have a higher risk for stroke, according to new research. "Studies have shown how stroke causes memory complaints," said Arfan Ikram, M.D., associate professor of neuroepidemiology at Erasmus University Rotterdam in ...

Early Warning Signs of Cognitive Impairment Provide Opportunity to Act

December 12th, 2014
New research suggests indications of cognitive decline associated with aging may surface during midlife. Recognition of these warning signs may allow individuals to modify behavior and lower their risk of cognitive deficits later in life. As presented at American College of Neuropsychopharmacology annual ...

Distracted to Learn?

December 10th, 2014
Surprising new research may rewrite learning theory as Brown University scientists contend that distractions do not necessarily impede the learning process of a motor task. Investigators discovered that if attention was as divided during recall of a motor task as it was during ...

Football Brain Injuries Require More Study

December 8th, 2014
The claim that playing football can result in lifelong damage to the brain may be premature. Reports have routinely linked aggression, violence, depression, and suicide with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative brain disease linked to playing football. But just how CTE and behavioral ...

Dietary Ketosis Aids Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

December 8th, 2014
Recent findings suggest that a very low-carbohydrate diet may boost memory in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Under fairly extreme low-carb conditions, the body starts to use compounds called ketones, made from the metabolism of fat or protein, as a source of ...

Bilingual Cognitive Advantage May Be Less than Advertised

December 8th, 2014
A new study challenges the idea that bilingual speakers have a cognitive advantage. The research suggests that a publication bias in favor of positive results may skew the overall literature on bilingualism and cognitive function. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal ...

Higher Birth Weight Linked to Better School Performance

December 7th, 2014
A new study has found that the higher a child’s weight at birth, the better that child performed on reading and math tests in school. According to researchers at the University of Florida and Northwestern University, this holds true throughout elementary school and ...

Worksite Creativity Bolstered by Political Correctness

December 3rd, 2014
New research suggests the perceived link between political correctness (PC) and conformity may be twisted. Investigators found that, paradoxically, imposing a norm that sets clear expectations of how women and men should interact with each other into a work environment encourages creativity among ...

Most People Pay Double to Spare Stranger from Pain

December 2nd, 2014
A new study shows that people are typically willing to sacrifice twice as much money to spare a stranger from pain, compared to the amount they would pay to spare themselves, even when their decision is anonymous. The study, conducted by researchers from ...