Cognition News

Can Training to See Words in Colors Boost IQ?

November 24th, 2014
A new UK study has shown for the first time that people can be trained to "see" letters of the alphabet as colors in a way that simulates how those with synesthesia experience their world. Synesthesia is a neurological condition in which some ...

Guidelines for Media Use in Toddlers

November 23rd, 2014
Two experts on child development have released their research-based guidelines to help parents understand the impact of media use on very young children. The research includes tips about how much screen time is OK, parent participation, the effects of parental screen use, ...

Boosting Self-Regulation Helps At-Risk Kids

November 22nd, 2014
An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills -- such as paying attention, following directions, and learning to stay on task -- has been shown to help prepare at-risk children for kindergarten. These skills are critical to a ...

Herpes Simplex Virus May Up Risk of Alzheimer’s

November 20th, 2014
A person who carries certain antibodies of the herpes simplex virus may be at double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to two new Swedish studies. "The identification of a treatable cause [herpes simplex] of the most common dementia disorder is a breakthrough," ...

Mindfulness + Cognitive Therapy = Less Prenatal Depression Risk

November 20th, 2014
Mindfulness techniques combined with cognitive therapy have been shown to reduce the risk of depression relapse among pregnant women. Mindfulness approaches include meditation, breathing exercises, and yoga while cognitive therapy challenges and alters maladaptive thoughts and feelings. University of Colorado, Boulder researchers found pregnant ...

People Often Rely on ‘Blind Insight’ to Make Decisions

November 19th, 2014
New research shows that when people have to guess the answer to an unknown question, they tend to feel greater confidence about decisions that would later turn out correct and less confidence about those that turned out incorrect. The study, conducted by researchers ...

Musical Expertise Linked to Robust Long-Term Memory

November 19th, 2014
A study of professional musicians suggests musical expertise improves long-term memory and cognitive performance. In the research, scientists from the University of Texas at Arlington measured electrical activity of neurons in the brains of 14 musicians and 15 non-musicians. Dr. Heekyeong Park, assistant professor ...

Rat Study Suggests Oxycodone Can Cause Long-term Behavioral Changes

November 18th, 2014
New research using a rat model suggests even brief usage of the painkiller oxycodone may impair behavior in a person even after use of the medication ends. Investigators believe use of oxycodone may result in a “cognitive hangover” that can lead to enduring ...

Cookie Monster Helps Kids Learn Self-Control

November 17th, 2014
An innovative study has determined that watching the Sesame Street video featuring the Cookie Monster can help children improve their executive skills. Deborah Linebarger, an associate professor at the University of Iowa, discovered that when a group of preschoolers watched videos of ...

New Brain Disease ID’d With Similarities to Alzheimer’s

November 17th, 2014
Researchers have identified a disease that has similar symptoms as Alzheimer’s yet is biologically different. Investigators believe the ability to diagnose different forms of memory impairment will aid the development of effective treatments for brain diseases. The new neurological disease is called primary age-related ...