Aggression and Violence News

‘Honeycomb’ Brain Damage Afflicts Some Vets Who Survive Blasts

January 26th, 2015
Researchers have discovered honeycomb-shaped patterns of broken and swollen nerve fibers in the brains of some veterans who survived an improvised explosive device (IED), according to a new study at Johns Hopkins University. These hidden brain injuries may be the physical evidence behind ...

Cyberstalking Worse Than Stalking?

January 25th, 2015
In a new study, researchers explored and compared the experiences of people who had been victims of stalking or cyberstalking (harassing or threatening via the Internet). They found that victims of cyberstalking had to engage in more 'self-protective' behaviors, pay higher out-of-pocket ...

Low-Income Boys Fare Worse in Wealthier Neighborhoods

January 24th, 2015
Boys from low-income families who grow up alongside wealthier neighbors tend to fare worse, not better, according to a new 12-year study from Duke University. In fact, the greater the economic gap between the boys and their neighbors, the worse the outcome. “Our ...

Difficult Kids May Have Challenges Later in Life

January 16th, 2015
The belief that a child will outgrow a tendency to display disruptive behavior may be the wrong tactic for a parent. While it is normal for a young child to have tantrums and be otherwise disruptive, researchers have found that ...

Specialized Approach Aids Early Education of Disruptive Children

January 13th, 2015
A new study finds a tailored educational program can improve the kindergartner and first grade experience of children displaying disruptive behaviors. Researchers explain that children with high maintenance temperaments have fewer opportunities to learn in school than their focused peers, and are at ...

Tips on Standing Up to Unethical Authority

January 12th, 2015
More than 50 years ago, a psychologist performed a now-infamous experiment on how people would obey authority even when asked to perform egregious actions. The year was 1961, and the memories of Holocaust atrocities and the prosecution of Nazi officials at Nuremberg were still fresh. Dr. Stanley ...

Fear of Terrorism May Lead to Job Burnout

January 11th, 2015
A new study has found a link between the fear of terrorism and an increased incidence of job burnout over time. The study, led by Dr. Sharon Toker of Tel Aviv University’s Faculty of Management, examines how the fear of terrorism can lead ...

Spoils of War May Include More Wives and Children

January 4th, 2015
A new study from Harvard University shows that there may be a biological benefit to violent conflict. The study found that among members of an East African herding tribe, those who engaged in violent raids on neighboring tribes had more wives, leading to ...

Testosterone Can Worsen Aggression in Alzheimer’s

January 1st, 2015
In men with Alzheimer’s disease, having higher levels of testosterone could increase the risk for aggression, hallucinations and other acting-out behaviors, according to a new study at the University of North Texas Health Science Center. Previous research has shown that having higher testosterone ...

How Much Do We Really Know About Cyberbullying?

December 30th, 2014
New research has shed more light on the devastating impact of cyberbullying. The findings, published in the journal Information, Communication & Society,  identify the main tactics used by perpetrators as well as the coping strategies of the victims. With the advent of social media, ...