Featured News

Mindfulness Found to Reduce Opioid Use

December 8th, 2014
A new program for people with chronic pain helps individuals reduce the need for opioid medications. Researchers from the University of Utah developed a program called Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) that applies mindfulness techniques to alleviate pain and craving. The MORE intervention concentrates on ...

Brain Activity Just After Quitting Smoking May Predict Relapse

December 7th, 2014
Smokers who attempt to quit but end up relapsing within seven days exhibit specific disruptions in the brain’s working memory system during their time of smoking abstinence, according to a new study by Penn Medicine. This distinct neural activity -- mainly a decrease ...

More Smartphone Use Leads to ‘Leisure Distress’

December 6th, 2014
A new study has found that young adults who are high-frequency smartphone users experience “leisure distress,” defined as feeling uptight, stressed, and anxious during free time. “The high-frequency cell phone user may not have the leisure skills necessary to creatively fill their free ...

Is Narcissism the New Norm?

December 5th, 2014
A new study questions if we are more narcissistic than we were in the past, and if narcissism is becoming common behavior? In the review, researchers discovered that at least on the surface, things have changed. Milleniaals, or those who came of age ...

Coping With Email Stress

December 4th, 2014
Are you overwhelmed by the amount of email you receive? Are you stressed by the thought of missing or not responding promptly to an important message? If you are, take heart -- new research provides some suggestions that can ease your state of mind. University ...

Turning Negatives into Positives

December 3rd, 2014
Most of us probably know someone who can routinely turn a negative trait into a personal advantage. While this behavior may be annoying, the ability to self-empower may also be inspiring. New research explains how this occurs as New York University (NYU) scientists posit ...

Most People Pay Double to Spare Stranger from Pain

December 2nd, 2014
A new study shows that people are typically willing to sacrifice twice as much money to spare a stranger from pain, compared to the amount they would pay to spare themselves, even when their decision is anonymous. The study, conducted by researchers from ...

Finding Flaws in Social Media Research

December 1st, 2014
Researchers need to be wary of serious pitfalls of working with huge social media data sets, according to computer scientists at McGill University in Montreal and Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Flawed results can have huge implications: Thousands of research papers each year ...

Complex Job May Lead to Better Long-Term Memory, Thinking Skills

November 30th, 2014
If you work at a job that requires complex work with other people (such as a social worker or lawyer) or with data (architect or graphic designer), you may end up having a better long-term memory and thinking skills compared to people ...

Older Brains Can Still Learn — Maybe Too Much

November 29th, 2014
Older people can actually take in and learn from visual information more readily than younger people, according to a new study. This surprising discovery is explained by a decline in the ability to filter out irrelevant information as we get older, according to ...