Depression News

Rejection Seems to Hurt Depressed People Longer

Rejection Seems to Hurt Depressed People Longer

February 28th, 2015
The pain of social rejection lasts longer for people with untreated depression, according to a new study. That’s because the brain cells of depressed people release less of a natural pain and stress-reducing chemical called natural opioids, researchers report in the journal Molecular ...
Telephone Support Can Help Ease Postnatal Depression

Telephone Support Can Help Ease Postnatal Depression

February 24th, 2015
Emerging research discovers telephone-based peer support helps to reduce postnatal or postpartum depression in new mothers. The new study, published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing, also found that social support from peers may be effective for maternal depression up to two years ...
Mice Study Suggests Some Disorders May Be Tied to 4-Hour Cycles

Mice Study Suggests Some Disorders May Be Tied to 4-Hour Cycles

February 23rd, 2015
A new animal study finds that four-hour cycles driven by the neurotransmitter dopamine may be implicated in the disturbed sleep-wake cycles of some mental disorders such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The study, led by Kai-Florian Storch, Ph.D., of the Douglas Mental Health ...
Diabetes, Depression Tied to Higher Risk of Dementia in Those with Mild Cognitive Impairment

Diabetes, Depression Tied to Higher Risk of Dementia in Those with Mild Cognitive Impairment

February 21st, 2015
People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at higher risk of developing dementia if they have diabetes or psychiatric symptoms such as depression, according to a new study. Researchers at University College London recently analyzed data from 62 separate studies, which included a ...
Unemployment Changes Personality — And Not For the Better

Unemployment Changes Personality — And Not For the Better

February 19th, 2015
A new study has found that unemployment can change peoples' core personalities, making some less conscientious, agreeable, and open, which may make it difficult for them to find new jobs. "The results challenge the idea that our personalities are 'fixed' and show that ...
Low-Serotonin Depression Theory Challenged

Low-Serotonin Depression Theory Challenged

February 18th, 2015
A new paper challenges the prevailing opinion that depression is related to low levels of serotonin in the gaps between nerve cells in the brain. This theory has predominated for nearly 50 years and has led to the development of the commonly prescribed ...
Vicious Cycle of Money Problems – Disordered Eating

Vicious Cycle of Money Problems & Disordered Eating

February 18th, 2015
New research suggests experiencing financial difficulties while attending college may increase the risk of female students developing an eating disorder. Researchers from University of Southampton also discovered that having extreme attitudes about food and eating predicted short-term financial difficulties for female students, suggesting the ...
Meditation Can Improve Sleep for Older Adults

Meditation Can Improve Sleep for Older Adults

February 17th, 2015
Emerging research suggests mindfulness meditation training helps improve sleep quality for older adults more effectively than traditional interventions. Mindfulness meditation practices were compared to a more structured program that focused on changing poor sleep habits and establishing a bedtime routine. Study results have been ...
Brief CBT Reduces Suicide Attempts among At-Risk Soldiers

Brief CBT Reduces Suicide Attempts among At-Risk Soldiers

February 16th, 2015
New research finds that short-term cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) dramatically reduces suicide attempts among at-risk military personnel. Investigators from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio led the two-year study on 152 active-duty soldiers who had either attempted suicide or had ...
Dramatic Changes in the Brain Explain Teenage Risk Taking

Dramatic Brain Changes May Help Explain Teen Risk-Taking

February 15th, 2015
Teenage exploration and risk taking could be explained by dramatic changes in the brain that allow elaborate planning, according to new research. A neuroscientist at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine also found that teenage brains are driven by the need for ...