Calhoun to discuss business models at London conference

1-day conference will focus on the phenomenon of patent trolls

George M. Calhoun, Executive-in-Residence at Stevens Institute of Technology’s Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management, will be the opening speaker at the December 8 conference, "Patent trolls: a pejorative or deserved epithet" Examining the phenomenon from both sides." Calhoun will discuss intellectual property business models at the one-day conference, held in London. His talk will address the business model’s potential impact on European business, as well as questions such as:

  • How did the business model develop?
  • How does it function?
  • What are its advantages and disadvantages?
  • What are the target industries?

This unique conference is the first of its kind in Europe. It was specifically designed to provide attendees with a practical and intensive review of the very latest developments in patent trolls, the important business considerations that must underlie patenting strategies and the current tactics that are proving successful for the leading players in the various industries today. IBC Legal Conferences has brought together an outstanding faculty of top industry experts and their advisers who will share information and provide insights from their own experiences.

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About Stevens Institute of Technology
Established in 1870, Stevens offers baccalaureate, masters and doctoral degrees in engineering, science, computer science, management and technology management, as well as a baccalaureate in the humanities and liberal arts, and in business and technology. Located directly across the Hudson River from Manhattan, the university has enrollments of approximately 1,780 undergraduates and 2,700 graduate students, and a current enrollment of 2,250 online-learning students worldwide. Additional information may be obtained from its web page at www.Stevens.edu.

For the latest news about Stevens, please visit www.StevensNewsService.com.


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