Doctors' extended duration work shifts are associated with medical errors and adverse events

A study from the U.S. of doctors in their first postgraduate year (interns) has showed that working extended shifts is associated with increased reporting by the doctors of medical errors, adverse patient events and attentional failures.

The study, published in PLoS Medicine, which was led by Charles Czeisler and Laura Barger from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, included 2737 medical residents, who completed 17,003 monthly reports. In months in which residents worked even one long shift-of 24 hours or more -they were three times more likely to report a fatigue-related significant medical error compared with months in which they worked no extended hours. The rate increased to more than -seven-fold higher in months in which more than five extended shifts were worked.

These errors apparently translated into adverse patient events; even in the months in which residents worked one extended shift they were seven times more likely to report an adverse patient event compared with months when no extended shift was worked. In addition, doctors working more than five extended duration shifts per month reported more attentional failures, (i.e., dozing off) during lectures, during ward rounds and during clinical activities, including surgery, and reported 300 percent more fatigue-related preventable adverse events resulting in the death of the patient.

A recent randomized controlled trial in critical care units showed that the elimination of extended duration work shifts reduced the rates of significant medical and attentional failures in that setting. This new study shows that extended duration shifts worked by a diverse population of interns across the U.S. are also associated with reporting of medical errors, adverse events and attentional failures.

The authors conclude that “These results have important public policy implications for post-graduate medical education.”

A Perspective article by Mariana Szklo-Coxe, from the University of Wisconsin, who was not involved in the study, discusses the findings further.

###

* * * * * * * EMBARGO: MONDAY, 11 December, 3.30 P.M. PST * * * * * * *

PLEASE MENTION THE OPEN-ACCESS JOURNAL PLoS MEDICINE (www.plosmedicine.org) AS THE SOURCE FOR THESE ARTICLES AND PROVIDE A LINK TO THE FREELY-AVAILABLE TEXT. THANK YOU.

All works published in PLoS Medicine are open access. Everything is immediately available without cost to anyone, anywhere—to read, download, redistribute, include in databases, and otherwise use—subject only to the condition that the original authorship is properly attributed. Copyright is retained by the authors. The Public Library of Science uses the Creative Commons Attribution License.

Citation: Barger LK, Ayas NT, Cade BE, Cronin JW, Rosner B, et al. (2006) Impact of extended-duration shifts on medical errors, adverse events, and attentional failures. PLoS Med 3(12): e487.

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030487

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-12-czeisler.pdf

CONTACT:
Jessica Podlaski
Department of Public Affairs
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
+1 617-534-1603
jpodlaski@partners.org

Related PLoS Medicine Perspectives article

Citation: Szklo-Coxe M (2006) Are residents’ extended shifts associated with adverse events" PLoS Med 3(12): e497.

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030497

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-12-szklo-coxe.pdf

CONTACT:
Mariana Szklo-Coxe
University of Wisconsin
Madison
United States of America
mszklo@wisc.edu

About PLoS Medicine

PLoS Medicine is an open access, freely available international medical journal. It publishes original research that enhances our understanding of human health and disease, together with commentary and analysis of important global health issues. For more information, visit http://www.plosmedicine.org

About the Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a non-profit organization of scientists and physicians committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource. For more information, visit http://www.plos.org


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

You must do the thing you think you cannot do.
~ Eleanor Roosevelt
 
Stumble This Article Print Email
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter

Users Online: 9662
Join Us Now!



 




Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code