GSA confers 2006 M. Powell Lawton Award to University of Washington's Teri

The Gerontological Society of America has chosen the University of Washington's Linda Teri to receive its 2006 M. Powell Lawton Award. The distinction recognizes a significant contribution in gerontology that has led to an innovation in gerontological treatment, practice or service, prevention, amelioration of symptoms or barriers, or a public policy change that has led to some practical application that improves the lives of older persons.

The award presentation will take place at GSA's 59th Annual Scientific Meeting, which will be held from November 16th-20th, 2006 in Dallas, TX. The actual conferral will occur on Sunday the 19th at 1:30 p.m. at the Adam's Mark Dallas Hotel. The meeting is organized to foster interdisciplinary interactions among clinical, administrative, and research professionals who specialize in the study of the aging process.

Teri has done groundbreaking research on interventions for patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD), mainly by using the strategy of training family caregivers in appropriate problem solving and behavior management approaches. The novelty of her work is that it challenges the usual assumption that problem behaviors in AD are determined solely by brain pathology, and that intervention must therefore be pharmacological, or involve teaching caregivers to better accept or adapt to these problems.

Teri's work has demonstrated that caregiver training can effectively decrease AD patients' depression, and that sleep disturbance in AD patients can be improved with behavioral intervention.

The award is named in memory of M. Powell Lawton for his outstanding contributions to applied gerontological research. It also honors an individual for exemplifying one or more of Lawton's outstanding professional and personal qualities. The winner traditionally presents a lecture at the Annual Scientific Meeting the following year. The award is sponsored by the Madlyn and Leonard Abramson Center for Jewish Life's Polisher Research Institute.

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The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), founded in 1945, is the oldest and largest national multidisciplinary scientific organization devoted to the advancement of gerontological research. Its membership includes some 5,000+ researchers, educators, practitioners, and other professionals in the field of aging. The Society's principal missions are to promote research and education in aging and to encourage the dissemination of research results to other scientists, decision makers, and practitioners.


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