76 percent of workers older than 60 years of age are overweight or obese

76% of workers older than 60 years of age are overweight or obese. However, less than one third of those 40 years of age and younger suffer these health issues. This is one of the conclusions shown in the research of Alberto Cordero of the School of Medicine, and the University Hospital, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, the Revista Espańola de Cardiología [Spanish Journal of Cardiology] and Medicina Clínica [Clinical Medicine].

The research group MESYAS (Metabolic Syndrome in Active Subjects), conducted a study of 19,041 active workers throughout Spain. Through these subjects, the project analyzed the incidence of metabolic syndrome, in conjunction with cardiovascular risk factors which tend to appear in the same individual, in order to obtain a common related physiopathology. Within the mutual periodic revisions, it was discovered that 12% presented this problem. The major impact of cardiovascular illness is the reduction of productivity and the elevation of mortality.

On the other hand, it was demonstrated that arterial hypertension, the alterations of the glucose metabolism, hypertriglyceridemia (excess of triglycerides in the blood) and metabolic syndrome, are the cardiovascular risk factors most associated with excessive weight and obesity. Furthermore, pre-hypertension, involving sustained blood pressure levels between 120-139 mmHg and 80-89 mmHg, affects 47% of active workers. He therefore concludes, according to his analysis, that there is a connection between metabolic syndrome and minor degrees of renal dysfunction.

Metabolic Syndrome and cardiovascular illness

The metabolic syndrome has acquired increasing interest in the area of prevention. In the first place, this syndrome is associated with the development of diabetes, closely linked to arterial thrombosis; and in the second place, it is a self-generating spur for acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular incidents, and peripheral arteriopathy.

Diverse research groups from the department of Cardiology at the University Hospital are working to fight against these illnesses, which have become the primary cause of death in the world. From their results, it can be ascertained that metabolic syndrome constitutes the principal risk factor for cardiopathic blood clots in certain groups of patients, such as those suffering from obesity, or mellitus diabetes.

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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