New study on relationship between literacy and understanding of prescription labels

Fifth Annual National Health Communication Conference

Moving Toward Real Solutions: Advances to Address Low Health Literacy

What: The American College of Physicians Foundation (ACPF) and the Institute of Medicine bring together leading researchers and other stakeholders from around the country to take a solution-oriented approach to the problem of low health literacy.

When: November 29, 2006; 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Where: National Academy of Sciences, 2100 C Street NW, Washington, DC

News: Health literacy expert and chairperson of the ACP Foundation's Patient-Centered Health Literacy Advisory Board Terry C. Davis, PhD, unveils the results of a new study on the relationship between literacy and understanding of container and auxiliary labels for prescription medications. The study, "To Err is Truly Human: Literacy and Misunderstanding of Prescription Drug Labels," is being released online to the public by Annals of Internal Medicine on November 29 before its print publication on December 19.

Additional health literacy expert speakers and topics include:

Charles Ganley, MD, Director Division of Over the Counter Products, Food and Drug Administration Topic: The Drug Facts labeling rule that mandates specific labeling content and format on OTC drug products and a brief review of studies used to evaluate consumer comprehension.

William Shrank, MD, MSHS, Instructor, Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Harvard University School of Medicine Topic: The ACP Foundation's Prescription Bottle Labeling Project is a two year project that is evaluating the evidence about how to improve prescription drug labels. Dr. Shrank and colleagues have communicated with key stakeholders to assess the problems with prescription labels and the best way to implement change.

For a complete list of speakers and topics, visit http://foundation.acponline.org/hl/hcc2006.htm.

Why: About half of all US adults 90 million people have difficulty understanding and acting on health information. Low health literacy may lead to patient errors. The ACP Foundation is focused on finding practical and evidence-based solutions to the problems of low health literacy. This conference provides an opportunity for attendees from an array of national organizations, including medicine, industry, pharmaceuticals, media, insurance, patient advocacy, and government to learn about the growing problem of low health literacy and the innovative solutions that can be implemented in various locales and settings.

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Media Contact: Media may register for the conference by contacting Steve Majewski, Senior Communications Associate American College of Physicians.


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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