New research to cut animal testing

Researchers at The University of Manchester have been awarded 130,000 to develop new techniques to reduce the need for animals in drug testing.

Current checks to establish whether a new drug is carcinogenic can be inconclusive and require further testing on live animals to establish whether they are harmful or not.

Dr Richard Walmsley and colleagues at the University spin-out company he founded, Gentronix, have developed techniques using cultured human cells to more effectively weed out cancer-causing compounds.

"The current pre-animal tests that are used are highly sensitive and so most carcinogens are identified," said Dr Walmsley, who is based in the Faculty of Life Sciences.

"Unfortunately, such tests have poor specificity and a lot of safe compounds are also wrongly identified as potential carcinogens. This means that animal testing is still carried out, in case such compounds turn out to be safe.

"The testing process developed at Gentronix has proven very reliable at telling us whether a drug will cause cancer but some chemicals, called promutagens, only become carcinogenic once they have passed through the body's liver.

"This grant will help us develop new non-animal experiments to identify these other toxic compounds and so reduce the need for animal testing."

The funding awarded by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) will help the scientists establish new genotoxicity tests using cultured human liver cells.

It is hoped the new test will not only reduce the number of compounds that are tested on animals but also ensure harmless chemicals that could prove to be useful new drugs are not falsely labelled as carcinogens.

"I don't believe that animal testing will disappear from drug safety assessment in the short term as you can't ask human volunteers to take novel drugs straight from testing done in tube tests," said Dr Walmsley.

"But if we can refine the pre-animal tests and increase people's confidence in them, then we will be able to reduce the number of chemicals that are tested on live animals."

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Notes for editors:

Gentronix was founded by Dr Walmsley in July 1999 to commercialise technology developed at what was the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) - now part of The University of Manchester. This innovative biotechnology company aims to accelerate the pace of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry by developing a range of productivity-enhancing tools for scientists in the drug-discovery field.

The NC3Rs grant will help fund two researchers for the project for a year and contribute towards new equipment.

Further details about Gentronix can be found at www.gentronix.co.uk

Information about NC3Rs can be found on its website: www.nc3rs.org.uk


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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