Ghengis Khan wonder berry could conquer heart disease

Berries taken since the time of Ghengis Khan could form the basis of the next big thing in heart health. Sea buckthorn is a known source of biologically active chemicals and is used in Tibet, Mongolia, China and Russia for health drinks and various cosmetics. Juice extracted using current methods is of poor quality, but scientists in India have developed a highly efficient technique to extract large quantities of cholesterol-lowering compounds. Two companies have shown interest in the process including one based in Mongolia.

In research due to be published this week in SCI's Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (DOI 10.1002/jsfa2620) Dr C Arumyghan and his team at the Regional Research Laboratory, Trivandrum report the implementation of a new process which retains more than 40% of polyphenols - the same beneficial chemicals found in red wine, 50% of flavonoids and 70% of vitamin C present in the pulp of the red berries.

Antioxidants in the berries inhibit so-called 'bad' LDL cholesterol oxidisation, which could provide a new weapon to fight cardiovascular disease. When LDL cholesterol is oxidized, it sticks to the lining of blood vessels. Consuming the berries in food or drinks is expected to prevent the arteries from clogging up.

Arumughan is confident that this technology had great potential, saying "No previous report has shown efficiency matching ours". Arumughan's team have unlocked the nutrients by applying novel processing technique for the first time. The key to their success is using continuous high speed centrifugation (spinning) to separate the juice and the solid sludge.

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Please credit the Journal / SCI as a news source.

About SCI
SCI is a unique international forum where science meets business on independent, impartial ground. Anyone can join, and the Society offers a chance to share information between sectors as diverse as food and agriculture, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, environmental science and safety. As well as publishing new research and running events, SCI has a growing database of member specialists who can give background information on a wide range of scientific issues.

Originally established in 1881, SCI is a registered charity with members in over 70 countries.

About the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
The Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (JSFA) publishes peer-reviewed original research and critical reviews in these areas, with particular emphasis on interdisciplinary studies at the agriculture/food interface. This international journal covers fundamental and applied research.

JSFA is an SCI journal, published by John Wiley & Sons, on behalf of the Society of Chemical Industry, and is available in print (ISSN: 0022-5142) and online (ISSN: 1097-0010) via Wiley InterScience http://www.interscience.wiley.com For further information about the journal go to http://interscience.wiley.com/jsfa

About Wiley
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., based in Chichester, England, is the largest subsidiary of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. provides must-have content and services to customers worldwide. Their core businesses include scientific, technical, and medical journals, encyclopedias, books, and online products and services; professional and consumer books and subscription services; and educational materials for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners. Wiley has publishing, marketing, and distribution centres in the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia and Australia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols JWa and JWb. Wiley's recently re-launched Internet site can be accessed at http://www.wileyeurope.com.


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