Childhood obesity briefing on Sept. 13

PROGRESS IN PREVENTING CHILDHOOD OBESITY: HOW DO WE MEASURE UP?, a new report from the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, examines the progress made by obesity-prevention initiatives in the United States over the past two years. It also outlines next steps for evaluating policies and programs that support obesity-prevention goals. The report builds on IOM's 2005 report PREVENTING CHILDHOOD OBESITY: HEALTH IN THE BALANCE, which recommended ways that families, schools, industry, the media, communities, and government could work together to address rising rates of obesity in children and youth. It will be released at a one-hour public briefing.

DETAILS:

Wednesday, Sept. 13, at 1 p.m. in the auditorium of the National Academies building, 2100 C Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.

Those who cannot attend may listen to a live video webcast of the briefing and submit questions using an e-mail form at http://national-academies.org.

REPORTERS:

Obtain copies or register to attend the briefing by contacting the Office of News and Public Information; tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail news@nas.edu. Advance copies of the report will be available to reporters only beginning at 1 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, Sept. 12. THE REPORT IS EMBARGOED AND NOT FOR PUBLIC RELEASE BEFORE 1 P.M. EDT ON SEPT. 13.

PARTICIPATING FROM THE COMMITTEE THAT WROTE THE REPORT:

  • Jeff Koplan (chair), vice president, Academic Health Affairs, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University, Atlanta

  • Douglas B. Kamerow, chief scientist, health, social and economics research, RTI International, Washington, D.C.

  • Marshall W. Kreuter, professor, Public Health Institute, College of Health and Human Sciences, Georgia State University, Atlanta

  • Eduardo J. Sanchez, commissioner, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin

  • Antronette (Toni) Yancey, associate professor and director, department of health services, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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