Henri Poincaré Prize goes to Ludvig Faddeev

Springer editor singled out for his achievements in mathematical physics

Springer editor Ludvig Faddeev was among this year's three winners of the Henri Poincaré Prize, one of the most prestigious awards in mathematical physics. It was presented to Faddeev at the International Congress on Mathematical Physics 2006 (ICMP) in Rio de Janeiro which took place from August 6 to 11.

Ludvig Faddeev received the prize for his "many deep and important contributions to the theory of quantum fields, quantization of non-commutative gauge theories, scattering in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory, and the theory of integrable systems." Faddeev is Editor-in-Chief of the Springer journal Functional Analysis and its Applications and a member of the Editorial Boards of Letters in Mathematical Physics and Mathematical Physics, Analysis and Geometry. In addition to publishing articles in numerous other Springer journals, he has also published several books with Springer, most recently as co-editor of Mathematical Events of the Twentieth Century. He is also on the board of Springer's forthcoming Modern Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics.

Ludvig Faddeev was born in 1934 in Leningrad and attended Leningrad University. Faddeev has been a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences since 1976, as well as a number of foreign academies, including the US National Academy of Sciences and the French Academy of Sciences. He is a former president of the International Mathematical Union (1986 – 1990).

The Henri Poincaré Prize is sponsored by the Daniel Iagolnitzer Foundation. It was created in 1997 to recognize outstanding contributions in mathematical physics and contributions which lay the groundwork for novel developments in this broad field. The prize is awarded every three years at the ICMP and, in each case, is awarded to three individuals. The prize is named after Henri Poincaré (1854–1912), one of the world's greatest mathematicians and theoretical physicists, as well as a philosopher of science.

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