Colon Cancer Alliance launches interactive support program

Aims to new initiative educate patients and caregivers about becoming an active partner in their treatment program

CHICAGO September 14, 2006 -- Every four minutes someone in the United States is diagnosed with colorectal cancer, a diagnosis that can be overwhelming without appropriate information and support. People living with colorectal cancer now have the opportunity to exchange ideas and information with experts in the field and fellow patients through an educational workshop series called "Conversations About Colorectal Cancer." The program launches this weekend at the Colon Cancer Alliance's (CCA) 6th Annual Colorectal Cancer Conference in Chicago.

The two-day interactive conference will allow patients to have a dialogue with thought-leading physicians in the area of colorectal cancer on a range of topics, from the latest treatment advances with targeted therapies to managing their side effects. In addition, patients and caregivers will have the opportunity to listen to, and support one another, in their collective battle against colorectal cancer.

"This program is an important way for those living with colorectal cancer to learn more about the nation's second-leading cancer killer," says Amy Kelly, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Colon Cancer Alliance. "By encouraging increased dialogue between patients, health care providers and caregivers, we hope to help patients learn how to successfully continue their daily activities and ultimately improve their quality of life."

According to a Harris Interactive survey of more than 500 cancer patients and 300 oncologists, patients who held discussions with their physicians about cancer topics were more knowledgeable about their condition than those who did not hold discussions. For example, only 10 percent of patients who did not participate in dialogue with their physician were knowledgeable about the extent of available treatment options. In addition, patients who did not have discussions with their physician were less knowledgeable about the possibility of treatment delays, infection, impact of low red and white blood cells, and proper patient education.

The national launch of the workshop series in Chicago will pave the way for 10 free, local workshops across the country through the end of 2006 and 2007. For information about where the workshops will be held, and to register, patients and their loved ones should visit www.ccalliance.org or call 1-877-422-2030. This educational workshop series is funded by an unrestricted educational grant from Amgen.

###

About Colorectal Cancer
Although more Americans have become aware of colorectal cancer in recent years, one person still dies of the disease every nine minutes. Colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be 148,610 new cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed in the United States in 2006; an estimated 55,170 also will die from colorectal cancer. In fact, one in 18 people in the United States will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime.

The Colon Cancer Alliance
The Colon Cancer Alliance (CCA) is a national patient advocacy organization, with chapters located across the country, and the official patient support partner of Katie Couric's National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance (NCCRA). CCA is dedicated to ending the suffering caused by colorectal cancer. The Colon Cancer Alliance brings the voice of survivors to battle colon cancer through patient support, education, research and advocacy. CCA invites any and all organizations, government agencies, members of the medical community and individuals impacted by this disease to add their voices by joining CCA in their determination to eradicate colorectal cancer. The Colon Cancer Alliance's toll-free helpline is 1-877-422-2030, or visit the Web site at www.ccalliance.org.


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

The most important things in life aren't things.
-- Art Buchwald