How can advances in biology be translated into better health?

Although advances in biomedical research have given new insights into the causes of disease, insights that could be translated into better medical treatments, such "translational science" faces major obstacles in the US, say authors from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

In a policy paper in PLoS Medicine, Howard Dickler and colleagues outline some of the obstacles that are getting in the way of such translational work.

These obstacles include the diminishing ability of clinical departments to underwrite research from patient-care revenues; the prospect of flat or declining National Institutes of Health budgets over the near term; overly burdensome regulatory requirements for translational research; undervaluation of translational work by academic medical culture; and the lure of greater financial rewards, and even professional satisfaction, in full-time clinical practice compared with doing translational research.

In response to these challenges, the AAMC convened a task force to advise the academic medical community on promoting translational research, and the authors lay out the key recommendations from the task force.

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All works published in PLoS Medicine are open access. Everything is immediately available without cost to anyone, anywhere--to read, download, redistribute, include in databases, and otherwise use--subject only to the condition that the original authorship is properly attributed. Copyright is retained by the authors. The Public Library of Science uses the Creative Commons Attribution License.

Citation: Dickler HB, Korn D, Gabbe SG (2006) Promoting translational and clinical science: The critical role of medical schools and teaching hospitals. PLoS Med 3(9): e378. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0030378

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030378

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-09-korn.pdf

CONTACT:

David Korn
Association of American Medical Colleges
Division of Biomedical and Health Sciences Research
2450 N Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037
United States of America
+1 (202) 828-0509
+1 (202) 828-1125 (fax)
dkorn@aamc.org

About PLoS Medicine

PLoS Medicine is an open access, freely available international medical journal. It publishes original research that enhances our understanding of human health and disease, together with commentary and analysis of important global health issues. For more information, visit http://www.plosmedicine.org.

About the Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a non-profit organization of scientists and physicians committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource. For more information, visit http://www.plos.org.


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

Ring the bells that still can ring. Forget your perfect offering. There is a crack, a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in.
~ Leonard Cohen
 
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