Public release date: 4-Sep-2006
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Contact: Andrew Hyde
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Dipstick test for meningitis culprits

Over a million people each year, most of them in the "meningitis belt" in Africa, contract bacterial meningitis, a potentially deadly infection of tissues that line the brain and spinal cord. The disease can be caused by several kinds of bacteria, and identifying the culprit early during an outbreak is critical to its containment. Suzanne Chanteau and colleagues in Niger have now developed a new series of simple and accurate tests that can determine the cause of an outbreak locally. As they describe in a research article in the international open-access medical journal PLoS Medicine, their "dipstick" tests require no fancy laboratory equipment, and not even refrigeration.

The tests, done on the patient's spinal fluid (which is obtained as a part of the routine evaluation of someone suspected of having meningitis) can determine whether the disease is caused by one of the four most common groups of meningococcus circulating in Africa. Two paper strips, the "dipsticks", are placed in two separate tubes of the patient's spinal fluid. After several minutes, the appearance of red lines on the dipsticks shows whether one of the four groups of meningococcus is present, and if so, which one.

The new dipstick test for meningococcal meningitis represents a major advance for health-care workers in remote locations affected by meningitis epidemics. This test can be stored without refrigeration and used at bedside in the hot temperatures typical of the African savannah during the meningitis season. The dipsticks are easier to use than currently available test kits, give more rapid results, and are more accurate. They promise to be an important tool for guiding individual treatment decisions as well as public health actions, including vaccine selection, against the perennial threat of epidemic meningitis.

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All works published in PLoS Medicine are open access. Everything is immediately available without cost to anyone, anywhere--to read, download, redistribute, include in databases, and otherwise use--subject only to the condition that the original authorship is properly attributed. Copyright is retained by the authors. The Public Library of Science uses the Creative Commons Attribution License.

Citation: Chanteau S, Dartevelle S, Mahamane AE, Djibo S, Boisier P, et al. (2006) New rapid diagnostic tests for Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, W135, C, and Y. PLoS Med 3(9): e337. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0030337

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030337

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-09-chanteau.pdf

Related image for press use: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-09-chanteau.jpg

CONTACT:

Suzanne Chanteau
CERMES (Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire)
PO Box 10 887
Niamey,
Niger
+227 752040
+ 227 753180 (fax)
schanteau@cermes.org

About PLoS Medicine
PLoS Medicine is an open access, freely available international medical journal. It publishes original research that enhances our understanding of human health and disease, together with commentary and analysis of important global health issues. For more information, visit http://www.plosmedicine.org

About the Public Library of Science
The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a non-profit organization of scientists and physicians committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource. For more information, visit http://www.plos.org


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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