New parks to protect animals seen as feasible

Researchers find many imperiled species occur in settings conducive to conservation

An article in the September 2006 issue of BioScience, the monthly journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), provides some rare good news for conservation biologists. Authors L. J. Gorenflo and Katrina Brandon used GIS (geographic information system) technology to study some 4,000 "gap" locations worldwide identified in previous research as harboring animals vulnerable to extinction yet unprotected by conservation regulations. Gorenflo and Brandon concluded that many of the gaps, which tend to occur disproportionately in the tropics, on islands, and in mountains, are locations where conservation measures appear feasible, because they include large tracts of conservation-compatible habitat and have a sparse human population, yet are not attractive for agriculture. Most of the gap locations did not feature high levels of threat from humans.

Gorenflo and Brandon's analysis did point to potential difficulties in establishing protected areas in some parts of the world. Human presence seems to be a hindrance to conservation in gap locations situated near coasts, including islands. In other regions, including parts of the Andes, Mexico, Brazil, and Africa, some gap locations have agricultural potential, which suggests that conservation measures there might be opposed by farming interests. Nevertheless, although other factors besides those analyzed by Gorenflo and Brandon influence the likelihood that protected areas are established, the findings suggest that efforts to establish new protected areas may be worthwhile in many parts of the world.

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BioScience publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles covering a wide range of biological fields, with a focus on "Organisms from Molecules to the Environment." The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is an umbrella organization for professional scientific societies and organizations that are involved with biology. It represents some 200 member societies and organizations with a combined membership of about 250,000.

The complete list of research articles in the September 2006 issue of BioScience is as follows:

Key Human Dimensions of Gaps in Global Biodiversity Conservation. L. J. Gorenflo and Katrina Brandon

Limestone Karsts of Southeast Asia: Imperiled Arks of Biodiversity. Reuben Clements, Navjot S. Sodhi, Menno Schilthuizen, and Peter K. L. Ng

Sustainable Management of Insect Herbivores in Grassland Ecosystems: New Perspectives in Grasshopper Control. David H. Branson, Anthony Joern, and Gregory A. Sword

A Rough Guide to Interdisciplinarity: Graduate Student Perspectives. Jessica K. Graybill, Sarah Dooling, Vivek Shandas, John Withey, Adrienne Greve, and Gregory L. Simon

Issues in Species Recovery: An Example Based on the Wyoming Toad. Victoria J. Drietz


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