Students awarded prizes at Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Annual Meeting in Boston

The SIAM Student Paper Prizes are awarded every year to the student author(s) of the most outstanding paper(s) submitted to the SIAM Student Paper Competition. These awards are based solely on the merit and content of the students' contribution to the submitted papers. The purpose of the SIAM Student Paper Prizes is to recognize outstanding scholarship by students in applied mathematics or computing. This year's winners represent the California Institute of Technology, Harvard University and the University of Florida.

The 2006 winners are:

Laurent Demanet of the California Institute of Technology for the paper titled "The Curvelet Representation of Wave Propagators is Optimally Sparse." The co-author is Emmanuel J. Candès, California Institute of Technology

Emanuele Viola of Harvard University for the paper titled "Pseudorandom Bits for Constant Depth Circuits with Few Arbitrary Symmetric Gates."

Hongchao Zhang of the University of Florida for his paper titled: "A New Active Set Algorithm for Box Constrained Optimization." The co-author is William W. Hager of the University of Florida.

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The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) was founded in 1952 to support and encourage the important industrial role that applied mathematics and computational science play in advancing science and technology. Along with publishing top-rated journals, books, and

SIAM News, SIAM holds about 12 conferences per year. There are also currently 45 SIAM Student Chapters and 15 SIAM Activity Groups.

SIAM's 2006 Annual Meeting themes included dynamical systems, industrial problems, mathematical biology, numerical analysis, orthogonal polynomials and partial differential equations.

For complete details, go to http://www.siam.org/meetings/an06/index.php .


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