Abnormal pattern of brain development in premature babies

Press release from PLoS Medicine

Measurement of the way that the brain grows after birth in preterm infants, particularly the relation between brain surface area and cortical volume, may help to predict neurodevelopmental impairment.

David Edwards and colleagues from Imperial College London used Magnetic Resonance Imaging to measure brain growth from 23 to 48 wk of gestation in 113 extremely premature infants born between 22 and 29 weeks of gestation. 63 of these children were then assessed to see how they were developing mentally at around 2 years of age. The researchers found that the brain surface area grew faster than the brain volume but that the slower the rate of growth of surface area relative to volume the more likely there was to be delayed development. The more premature babies, and those that were male, were most likely to have a slower growth of the brain surface compared with the brain volume.

These findings suggest that the normal pattern of brain growth during development, by which the surface area grows more than the volume, is disrupted in babies that are born prematurely and the amount of disruption of the growth may predict whether there is delayed development 2 years later. The earlier the birth, the greater the disruption is; in addition, boys are affected more than girls.

If these results are confirmed in more babies then it may be possible to monitor brain growth after birth in order to predict which children might need development support later on. The research also suggests possible avenues for further work to understand the exact neuroanatomy of impairment in these children.

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Citation: Kapellou O, Counsell SJ, Kennea N, Dyet L, Saeed N, et al. (2006) Abnormal cortical development after premature birth shown by altered allometric scaling of brain growth. PLoS Med 3(8): e265.

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030265

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-08-edwards.pdf

CONTACT:


David Edwards


Imperial College London
MRC Clinical Sciences Centre
Hammersmith Hospital
Du Cane Rd
London, England W12 0NN United Kingdom
+44 208 383 3326
+44 208 740 8281 (fax)
david.edwards@imperial.ac.uk

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