DC-area media invited to tour state-of-the-art air quality experiment

Improved monitoring of air quality from space and the ground is the focus of a unique field experiment now taking place in Beltsville, Md., along the Interstate 95 corridor.

Scientists from NASA, Howard University, the National Weather Service and several other institutions have assembled a powerful array of instruments to study summertime air pollution and compare measurements from the ground with those of NASA's fleet of Earth-observing satellites.

Media are invited to see the experiment in progress on Aug. 3 during the launch of a scientific weather balloon. Media will be able to interview scientists about ozone pollution, forecasting weather and NASA's capabilities to study global air quality and climate change. Graduate students from many institutions will also be available to discuss their experience working on this advanced research project.

WHAT:
Tour an advanced air quality and weather research facility, watch the launch of scientific balloon, interview scientists and students

WHERE:
Howard University Research Campus, Beltsville, Md. (Media will be escorted to the site from the Goddard Visitor's Center, Soil Conservation Rd., Greenbelt, Md.)

WHEN:
Thursday, Aug. 3. Bus departs Goddard Visitor's Center at 12:30 p.m.; site tour ends at 3:00 p.m.

Participants will include:

  • David Whiteman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Atmospheres, Greenbelt, Md.

  • Everette Joseph, Howard University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington

  • Joseph Facundo, National Weather Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, Md.

###

News media wishing to attend this event should contact:

Lynn Chandler
Goddard Public Affairs
tel. (301) 286-2806
e-mail lynn.chandler.1@gsfc.nasa.gov

Kerry-Ann Hamilton
Howard University Office of University Communications
tel. (202) 238-2631
e-mail k_hamilton@howard.edu


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

Affirmations are like prescriptions for certain aspects of yourself you want to change.
-- Jerry Frankhauser