Investigation into improving quality of life after cancer

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have been awarded 1.9 million to further understanding of how the quality of patients' lives can be improved following serious illness

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have been awarded 1.9 million to further understanding of how the quality of patients' lives can be improved following serious illness.

The 'Cancer Experiences Collaborative' will investigate ways in which patients and their families can cope more effectively and maximise the benefits of treatment. Researchers also aim to improve the understanding of the social, psychological and clinical problems experienced by elderly people and people with cancer.

Professor Mari Lloyd-Williams leads Liverpool's Academic Palliative and Supportive Care Studies Group, said: "The experiences of people affected by cancer can help further understanding of the disease so that improvements in facilities, clinical environments and supportive care can be specifically targeted.

"As well as carrying out new programmes of research, we will be supporting and mentoring individuals to enable them to become independent researchers in palliative and supportive care."

The University of Liverpool is already an international centre of excellence for palliative and supportive care research. Academics will focus on how to manage specific symptoms such as depression, nausea, fatigue and breathlessness associated with cancer and other end-stage illnesses in order to allow the greatest quality of life.

Together with the Universities of Lancaster, Manchester, Sheffield and Southampton the University of Liverpool will also be working with leading hospice charities, cancer clinicians and service providers. The research, funded by the National Cancer Research Institute, also aims to improve clinical practice and the way palliative and supportive care services are organised.

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Notes to editors

1. The University of Liverpool is one of the UK's leading research institutions. It attracts collaborative and contract research commissions from a wide range of national and international organisations valued at more than 90 million annually.


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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