New engineering careers brochure unveiled

For 11-13-year-old students

IEEE-USA has unveiled a new six-panel engineering careers brochure that is designed for 11-13-year-old, sixth-to- eighth grade U.S. students. Titled "My Science, My Math, My Engineering! How Am I Ever Going to Use This Stuff in the Real World?," the brochure: (1)lists courses youngsters should take to get ready for engineering; (2) shows how they can figure out "if engineering is interesting"; and (3) asks "what could *you* do if you were an engineer?" In one of the brochure panels, James Michener, the novelist and short story writer, is quoted: "Scientists dream about doing great things, engineers do them."

Some 20,000 copies of "My Science, My Math, My Engineering!" have been preordered by more than two-dozen U.S. children's museums. These include: The Exploratorium, in San Francisco; the Science Museum of Virginia, in Richmond; and the Buffalo Museum of Science. Large quantities have also been requested by organizations with K-12 student sci-tech enrichment programs, such as the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif.; and the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, in Huntsville, Ala.

Members of IEEE-USA's Precollege Education Committee, including a school teacher, drafted the text. And IEEE-USA volunteer members pretested the brochure for readability and design with students in the target age range. "My Science, My Math, My Engineering!" complements an earlier IEEE-USA publication aimed at high-school students, "Careers in Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering."

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To see the new brochure for younger students, go to http://www.ieeeusa.org/volunteers/committees/pec/Precollege_brochure.pdf .

Copies can be obtained without charge by writing to IEEE-USA Communications Assistant Helen Hall at h.hall@ieee.org.

For more information on IEEE-USA, go to http://www.ieeeusa.org.


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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