New cue used to perceive motion in depth

Rockville, Md. – A third 3D motion cue, dynamic half-occlusion, has been identified by researchers as a means by which the percept of motion in depth is achieved, according to a new study recently published in Journal of Vision, an online, free access publication of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO).

Building on principles of binocular geometry established by Leonardo da Vinci, Drs. Kevin Brooks and Barbara Gillam of the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, conducted a series of experiments in which observers were asked to match the amplitude of motion in depth seen through stereoscopic stimuli presented on two computer monitors. Dynamic versions of a monocular gap stereogram were used to produce a percept of motion in depth from changes in the locations of unmatched features, despite a lack of any previously known cues to 3D motion. The studies showed that while the established cues of changing disparity (CD) and interocular velocity difference (IOVD) are involved in the percept of motion in depth for features visible in both eyes, a new cue, dynamic half-occlusion, is used when unmatched features are observed.

"The benefits of this knowledge enhance the potential for creating more effective simulation of motion in 3D displays and virtual environments," said Brooks. "It will also be interesting to see whether neurophysiological studies are able to locate the cells that mediate these processes."

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You can read this article online in Journal of Vision at http://www.journalofvision.org/6/7/2. Journal of Vision is published by ARVO, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. All articles are free and open to anyone.

Established in 1928, The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc. (ARVO) is a membership organization of more than 11,500 eye and vision researchers from over 70 countries. The Association encourages and assists its members and others in research, training, publication and dissemination of knowledge in vision and ophthalmology. ARVO's headquarters are located in Rockville, Md. The Association's Web site is www.arvo.org.


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