FSU to host national forum on the future of science education

How should science be taught in America's schools? Florida State University will host a panel of nationally known scholars from such disciplines as biology, law, philosophy and theology as they participate in a public forum to discuss that and other topics of critical importance to our nation's future.

'KEEPING SCIENCE AND RELIGION SEPARATE IN SCHOOLS: THE VIGIL AFTER DOVER'

WEDNESDAY, MAY 17

8 P.M.

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AUDITORIUM

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

In addition, a media availability with several panelists will be held on Wednesday, May 17, at 2 p.m. in Beth Moor Lounge, located in the Longmire Building on the FSU campus.

As its name suggests, "Keeping Science and Religion Separate in Schools: The Vigil After Dover" will focus heavily on the issue of teaching intelligent design versus evolution, particularly in light of the landmark case Kitzmiller et al. v. The Dover Area School District et al. Possible alterations to science textbooks and curricula in public schools are likely to be key topics for discussion.

The forum also will extend beyond the intelligent design controversy to examine how a greater emphasis on science education is essential to the nation's future. Issues such as the United States' ability to compete in the global marketplace and the ramifications for our national security are just two of the topics likely to be discussed. In this context, "The Vigil After Dover" is of national interest.

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For additional information about the forum and its six highly respected panelists, visit www.research.fsu.edu/dover/index.aspx or www.fsu.com/pages/20http://DoverDesign.html. To speak with forum organizer Frank Stephenson, call (850) 644-8634.


Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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