Turning green into yellow

Improving plants for use as home-grown fuels

Washington, DC - Future increases in biofuels production will require plants with new characteristics to generate new crops that work well for fuel production.

This will be the topic of a presentation on Monday, May 8 in Washington, DC by Dr. Kenneth Keegstra, Director of the Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University.

"Future increases in biofuels production will require plants with new characteristics," said Dr. Keegstra. "But we don't have 100 years to generate new crops that work well for fuel production."

In the past 100 years, scientists have produced plants that are vastly improved over traditional crops in terms of food quality and yield. Can changes in plant characteristics to enhance biofuels yields be made in 10 to 20 years? What traits need to changed? What new knowledge is needed to accomplish these changes?

"We are honored to have Dr. Keegstra featured in National C-FAR's 'LUNCH~N~LEARN' Hill Seminar Series," said Joe Layton, President of National C-FAR.

The American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) is assisting National C-FAR in sponsoring the seminar. Professor Keegstra is a member of ASPB.

The 12:30-1:30 luncheon seminar will be held in Room SC-4 of the Capitol. The seminar is open to the media. Media questions related to Dr. Keegstra's presentation and his research should be directed to Brian Hyps, American Society of Plant Biologists at (301) 251-0560 x114 or bhyps@aspb.org.

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For additional information, go to www.ncfar.org; or contact Tom Van Arsdall, Executive Director, at tom@vanarsdall.com.


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