New treatment against persistent ulcer-inducing bacteria successful

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – May 1, 2006 - For those who suffer from stomach ulcers, the daily routine of breakfast, lunch and dinner can be painful. A common cause of these ulcers, as well as other gastric malignancies, is a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. For some, this infection can be persistent and difficult to treat.

Many approaches have been taken in an attempt to clear such infections, but with limited or unsuccessful outcomes. In a recent meta-analysis of therapies published in the April issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology, Levofloxacin-based triple therapy was found to be better tolerated and more effective than bismuth-based quadruple therapy for patients with persistent H. pylori despite previous treatment attempts. Levofloxacin is commonly prescribed to treat such infections as pneumonia, bronchitis and urinary tract infections.

According to author William D. Chey, "Helicobacter pylori is a highly prevalent chronic infection with a worldwide prevalence of nearly 50% and U.S. prevalence of 20-40%." This bacterial infection is particularly difficult to treat because of its ability to adapt to the harsh environment in the stomach. The bacterium guards itself in the lining of the stomach, which prevents the body's natural defenses (Killer T Cells) from attacking it.

Levofloxacin-based triple therapy may offer an effective and safe treatment option for patients with persistent H. pylori infection, according to researchers. With so many people living with this infection, it has become increasingly important to achieve effective methods of treatment. Levofloxacin-based therapy may prove to be this method.

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This study is published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. Media wishing to receive a PDF of the study please contact: medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

William D. Chey, MD is Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine and Director, Gastrointestinal Physiology Laboratory at the University of Michigan. Dr. Chey is conducting research and has extensively published in the areas of GERD and Helicobacter pylori. Dr Chey is conducting research and has published extensively in the areas of functional bowel disease, GERD, and Helicobacter pylori. Dr. Chey can be contacted by e-mail for interviews at wchey@umich.edu.

About The American Journal of Gastroenterology
The clinical journal in gastroenterology: The American Journal of Gastroenterology meets the day-to-day demands of clinical practice. Aimed at practicing clinicians, the journal's articles deal directly with the disorders seen most often in patients. The journal brings a broad-based, interdisciplinary approach to the study of gastroenterology, including articles reporting on current observations, research results, methods of treatment, drugs, epidemiology, and other topics relevant to clinical gastroenterology.

About the American College of Gastroenterology
The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) was founded in 1932 to advance the scientific study and medical practice of diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The College promotes the highest standards in medical education and is guided by its commitment to meeting the individual and collective needs of clinical GI practitioners.

About Blackwell Publishing
Blackwell Publishing is the world's leading society publisher, partnering with more than 665 academic, medical, and professional societies. Blackwell publishes over 800 journals and, to date, has published close to 6,000 text and reference books, across a wide range of academic, medical, and professional subjects.


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