Retrospective commemorates late PNAS journal editor-in-chief



Nicholas Robert Cozzarelli, editor-in-chief of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and a professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Courtesy...
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A retrospective in remembrance of the life and work of Nicholas Cozzarelli--dedicated professor, researcher, and editor-in-chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)--publishes today in PNAS's Online Early Edition. Cozzarelli died March 19 at the age of 67.

As the leader of PNAS--the official journal of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS)--for over 10 years, Cozzarelli spearheaded dynamic initiatives, vastly improving the quality and reach of the journal. He opened research article submissions to the global scientific community by allowing authors to submit papers without sponsorship of a NAS member. A proponent of open-access publishing, Cozzarelli instituted changes giving researchers and the general public free and easy access to PNAS papers online, and challenged others to follow suit.

An editorial by colleague and former NAS President Bruce Alberts accompanies the retrospective article. Cozzarelli "managed to maintain his position as a pioneer in the highly competitive DNA field, while spending half of his time as the editor-in-chief of the Academy's scientific journal," says Alberts.

The retrospective, "In Memoriam: PNAS Editor-in-Chief Nicholas R. Cozzarelli (1938-2006)," and accompanying editorial, "The Nick Cozzarelli I Knew," will appear in the April 18 print issue of PNAS.

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The retrospective and editorial are freely available online at http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0602531103v1 and http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0602591103v1


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