Human impacts on natural systems is topic of National Science Foundation forum

Fifth annual mini-symposium on long-term ecological research addresses emerging science themes

On Thursday, March 9, 2006, the National Science Foundation will hold its fifth annual mini-symposium on Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER). This year's forum focuses on understanding how humans have shaped urban, rural and natural ecosystems at every level from local to global.

The symposium will feature overviews of such topics as: land use history and patterns of biodiversity in southern Appalachian forests; climate warming and threshold changes in Arctic and boreal ecosystems; human impacts on land cover change in arid lands; ecosystem responses to hydrologic change in the Everglades; and combining archaeology and ecology in desert grasslands.

The LTER network comprises 26 field sites located primarily in the United States, but with a geographic span from the Arctic and Antarctic to the tropics. The sites represent Earth's major ecosystems, and include deserts, grasslands, forests, tundra, urban areas, agricultural systems, freshwater lakes, coastal estuaries and salt marshes, coral reefs and coastal ocean zones.

Who:
James Collins, NSF Assistant Director for Biological Sciences
Henry Gholz, NSF Program Director for Long-Term Ecological Research
LTER Scientists (Please see list on link to detailed agenda)

What:
Mini-symposium on results of Long-Term Ecological Research

When:
Thursday, March 9, 2005, 8:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m.

Where:
National Science Foundation
4201 Wilson Blvd.
Room 110
Arlington, VA 22230

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NSF-MA 06-005

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