Meeting on WIPO 'Webcasting Treaty'

The "Treaty on the Protection of Broadcasting Organizations," proposed by the World Intellectual Property Organization, would give broadcasters and webcasters new intellectual property (IP) rights to the material that they disseminate. Advocates of the treaty say these communities need more IP rights because current laws are inadequate, while critics argue that it would hinder access to information and financially burden consumers and businesses. The National Academies will hold a public symposium to discuss the merits and drawbacks of the webcasting portion of the treaty.

DETAILS:
1:15 p.m. to 5 p.m. EST on Feb. 22 in the auditorium of the National Academies building, 2100 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Reporters who cannot attend may listen to a live audio webcast of the event at http://national-academies.org. A preliminary agenda is available online at http://www7.nationalacademies.org/biso/Webcasting_Treaty_Symposium.html.

SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE:
Michael Keplinger, senior counsel, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Washington, D.C.
James Love, director, Consumer Project on Technology, Washington, D.C.
Jonathan Potter, executive director, Digital Media Association, Washington, D.C.

REPORTERS: REGISTER TO ATTEND by contacting the Office of News and Public Information at tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail news@nas.edu

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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