Call for entries: 2006 Acoustics Writing Awards

To encourage the communication of acoustical science and engineering to the general public, the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) sponsors two annual awards for outstanding popular works on acoustics. One award is for a popular piece on acoustics composed by a journalist or group of journalists and the other is for a popular piece on acoustics composed by an acoustics professional or group of professionals. Each award includes a $1000 prize and an award certificate, which will be presented at the ASA meeting to be held in Honolulu in November 2006.

The basic criteria for entries are accessibility of the piece by the general public, relevance to acoustics, accuracy, and the quality of the entry. There are two aspects of accessibility: the piece should be at a technical level easily understandable by the general public, and its venue should be one readily available to the general public. Entries may be from a variety of media, including video, World Wide Web sites, books, newspapers, magazines, audio tapes, audio broadcasts, etc. Entries should have been published, issued, or broadcast between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2005. Entries may be submitted by the authors or by others who wish to nominate entries. Multiple entries by a single author are accepted.

In 2005, ASA opted to give both Science Writing Awards to journalists. The winners were Kate Ramsayer for her piece "Infrasonic Symphony" published in Science News and Declan Butler for his piece "Sound and Vision" published in Nature. To enter, please send 12 copies of each entry (legible photocopies are acceptable if originals are not available) making sure that it includes author name, publication name, and publication date, publisher's address, and author's complete contact information (including email address) by April 1, 2006 to:

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For more information, please contact:

Ben Stein, American Institute of Physics, 301-209-3091, bstein@aip.org

Elaine Moran, Acoustical Society of America, 516-576-2360, elaine@aip.org

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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