For European media only: Can latest advances in health psychology help improve HIV care?

11/11/05

Largest international behavioural study exploring patient/physician beliefs of self-injectable HIV treatment

Initial results from the OpenMind study, the largest behavioural study to look at both patients' and physicians' perceptions to a self-injectable HIV therapy (enfuvirtide) will be presented at the 10th European AIDS Conference of the European AIDS Clinical Society on 18th November in Dublin.

The study findings will aim to provide insights into:

  • What physician barriers exist to prescribing self-injectable HIV therapy?
  • Why are doctors using self-injectable antiretrovirals for only a fraction of their clinically eligible patients?
  • How do doctor and patient beliefs match up with clinical evidence?
  • How can understanding physicians' perspectives of prescribing barriers help improve HIV care?

The OpenMind study looks set to help optimise HIV care in treatment experienced patients by exploring the hidden dynamics of the doctor-patient relationship to help develop evidence based interventions.

These results are likely to not only have an impact in HIV care but also across a whole range of therapeutic areas where injectable treatments are used.

For more information and an opportunity to speak with one of the study lead investigators, please contact:
Tel: +44 (0)7904 660 693
Email: laura.bertossi@ketchum.com

The OpenMind study was designed by Professor Rob Horne and Roche and reviewed by a panel of HIV treating physicians and community representatives. Data collection was undertaken by an independent agency and all interviews were conducted in accordance with the Data Protection Act and the MRS Code of Conduct by trained medical interviewers. Data analysis was conducted under the supervision of Professor Rob Horne and supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Roche.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

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