AGU 2005 Fall Meeting - media advisory 5

11/22/05

Press conference schedule; field trip itinerary

Contents of this message

1. Final press conference information
2. Attention PIOs: Sending press releases to Fall Meeting
3. Field trip itinerary
4. News Media registration information
5. News Media Registration Form
6. Who's coming

Please see:

Media Advisory 1 for important information regarding visas for international reporters: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0524.html

Media Advisory 2 for information on hotel bookings at meeting rates. (The deadline was 3 November 2005.) http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0533.html

Media Advisory 3 for information on searching online for sessions and abstracts: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl05336.html

Media Advisory 4 for updated field trip information: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl05339.html


1. Final press conference information

Following is the latest available information on press conferences planned for Fall Meeting. As always, it is subject to change prior to, and during, the meeting. Changes may include addition or deletion of press conferences, changes in participants, or changes in the emphasis of a press conference. Any changes occurring subsequent to this message will be announced in the Press Room at Fall Meeting; this is the final pre-meeting media advisory.

Overview of Fall Meeting
Monday, 5 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
0800h

With over 11,000 oral and poster presentations in nearly 1,000 sessions, Fall Meeting can be tricky to navigate. As usual, we will kick off with this informational session, in which the chair of the committee that organized the meeting provides tips about some of the newsworthy sessions that are not covered by press conferences.

Participant:
Jeffrey Plescia, Chair, Fall Meeting Program Committee; Applied Physics Laboratory, John Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, USA.


Threats to the teaching of Earth and Space Science
Monday, 5 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1000h

With natural disasters in the news almost every month, with raging debates on what should be taught in science classrooms, and with science itself under attack, this press conference will provide perspectives from some of our nation's leading scientists and science educators on steps to ensure that all citizens of the U.S. have a better understanding of our planet. Panelists will discuss the current "Threats to the Teaching of Earth and Space Sciences" and how the lack of understanding important Earth processes could lead to greater economic loss--and loss of life--in the future.

Participants:
Margaret Leinen, Assistant Director, Directorate for Geosciences, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia, USA;
Russanee Low, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Digital Library for Earth System Education, UCAR Office of Programs, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
Judy Scotchmoor, Assistant Director, University of California Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley, California, USA.

Session: U11C


Mars Express: Revealing the Red Planet's Past and Present
Monday, 5 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1200h

The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on the Mars Express orbiter has obtained its first signals from the planet's subsurface, addressing the inventory of water and the long-term geologic history of the planet. SPICAM, a dual ultraviolet/infrared spectrometer, has obtained the first identification of carbon dioxide condensation clouds at high altitude in the deep night of Mars. The presence of these clouds emphasizes the presence of tiny dust grains that serve as condensation nuclei at very high altitudes, and the coolness of the atmosphere in this region, which may impact on trajectories of orbiters and descent probes . The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) has by now covered nearly 30 percent of the Martian surface. Among recent findings are that Mars fell globally dry and cold 3.5 billion years ago; fluvial activity and open bodies of water vanished at that time; at both poles, volcanic activity seems to have occurred until very recently, and is possibly still ongoing. The OMEGA instrument has made mineralogical identifications, with a special emphasis on water-induced processes.

Participants:
Jean-Loup Bertaux, principal investigator of SPICAM, Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS/IPSL, Verrieres-le-Buisson, France;
Gerhard Neukum, principal investigator of HRSC, Institute for Geosciences, Free University, Berlin, Germany;
Jean-Pierre Bibring, principal investigator of OMEGA, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, France;
Giovanni Picardi, principal investigator of MARSIS, Professor of Remote Sensing, Infocom Department, University of Rome "La Sapienza," Rome, Italy;
Jeffrey J. Plaut, Co-principal investigator of MARSIS, Research Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA.

Session: P13C


Mars Rovers Celebrate First Martian Anniversary
Monday, 5 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1300h

In late November and early December, NASA's surprisingly long-lived rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, are completing a full Martian year of work on the surface of Mars. The adventure continues more than 22 months into what was originally planned as a three-month mission. Recently, Opportunity reached exposures of water-altered bedrock with intriguing differences from the stack of layers it examined inside a crater last year. Spirit is hurrying downhill to investigate a platform-like feature before Martian winter sets in, but keeps finding surprises along the way. Researchers are still struggling to decipher the ancient environmental history of Spirit's vicinity from an increasingly diverse set of clues.

Participants:
Stephen Squyres, principal investigator, NASA Mars Exploration Rovers, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA;
John Grotzinger, science team member, NASA Mars Exploration Rovers, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA;
John Callas, deputy project manager, NASA Mars Exploration Rovers, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA
Jim Bell, lead scientist for panoramic cameras, NASA Mars Exploration Rovers, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.

Session: P11D


Diversity of Hydrothermal Systems at Slow Spreading Ocean Ridges
Monday, 5 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1500h

The discovery of the black smoker vents and distinctive vent animals new to science in the Atlantic Ocean 20 years ago overturned the consensus of the scientific community at that time that such vents could only occur within the "Ring of Fire" of the Pacific. The Atlantic discovery opened the floodgates to new discoveries in the Atlantic, Arctic, and Indian oceans. The latest of these are reported in these sessions. The press conference will provide examples of newly found spectacular deep sea diversity with global impacts, regarding submarine earthquakes, volcanoes, ore deposits, and the evolution of life.

Participants:
Peter Rona, Professor of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA;
Colin Devey, Chair, InterRidge Program and Head of Research Division "Dynamics of the Ocean Floor", Leibniz-Institut fur Meereswissenshaften, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany;
Robert Reves-Sohn, Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA.

Session: OS21C


Discovering Space Weather "Cold Fronts"
Monday, 5 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1600h

Scientists have identified large, global-scale disturbances that form in Earth's upper atmosphere during space storms and disrupt the signals we use to communicate, navigate, and monitor our borders. Although these disturbances had previously been observed locally and sporadically, this new combined view provides an unprecedented global perspective that allows scientists to see the structures in their entirety and understand how and why they evolve with time. This global view has been accomplished by combining measurements from the ground and space by instruments developed and operated for NASA and the National Science Foundation.

Participants:
Barbara Giles, Living with a Star Geospace Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA;
Jerry Goldstein, Principal Scientist, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, USA;
Anthea Coster, Research Scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Haystack Observatory, Westford, Massachusetts, USA;
Tony Mannucci, Supervisor, Ionosphere and Atmosphere Remote Sensing Group, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA.

Session: SA11A


2004 Earthquake/Tsunami: Seafloor Observations Help Explain the Disaster
Tuesday, 6 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
0800h

Following the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman event, oceanographic expeditions, including the Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami Offshore Survey (SEATOS), were organized on extremely short notice to investigate the seafloor in the vicinity of the earthquake epicenter. Analyses of the earthquake's magnitude, intensity, and its generation of seafloor displacements have been completed by several investigators and compared with other observations (seafloor and GPS), showing significant differences between models and observations. Tsunami wave models have been run to match the wave observations, but their input data is not consistent with the earthquake model-predicted fault motion. Observations suggest greater seafloor displacements than models do and may explain the extreme wave heights that hit Banda Aceh and some locations in Thailand.

Participants:
Stephan Grilli, Professor, Department of Ocean Engineering, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett,, Rhode Island, USA;
Kerry Sieh, Professor, Tetonics Observatory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA;
Kate Moran, Associate Professor, Department of Ocean Engineering, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, Rhode Island, USA.

Session: U11A


Ozone Hole: Prospects for Recovery
Tuesday, 6 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
0900h

Twenty years after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it now appears that its recovery may take longer than previously predicted. This briefing takes a look at ozone depletion over both poles and presents new results on the surprisingly high levels of ozone-destroying halocarbons still being released in the United States and Canada. NASA scientists provide an overview of the 2005 ozone layer record and report on new satellite observations of the high levels of ozone-destroying chlorine in the stratosphere over both poles that are declining very slowly. NOAA scientists will provide new projections of when the ozone hole may fully recover, along with some surprising differences between how recovery will occur in the Arctic versus the Antarctic.

Panelists:
Paul Newman, Atmospheric Scientist, Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
Dale Hurst, Research Associate, Earth System Research Laboratory, NOAA Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
John Austin, UCAR Visiting Scientist, Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry Group, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA;
Michele Santee, Co-Investigator, Aura Microwave Limb Sounder team, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA.

Session: A13D


Inside the San Andreas Fault Earthquake Machine
Tuesday, 6 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1100h

EarthScope, the National Science Foundation's largest undertaking in solid earth science, achieved one of its major milestones this summer when the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) successfully drilled into the heart of the San Andreas Fault to a depth of two miles. Scientists now have their first observations from inside an active earthquake zone within a major plate boundary. Results from the summer's drilling, sampling, logging, and coring are being presented in 38 papers at this meeting. The results are redefining our understanding of fault mechanics and the earthquake generation process.

Participants:
Mark D. Zoback, SAFOD Principal Investigator, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA;
Stephen H. Hickman, SAFOD Principal Investigator, U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA;
William L. Ellsworth, SAFOD Principal Investigator, U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA;
Naomi L. Boness, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA;
John G. Solum, U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA.

Session: T21A


Cassini's Marathon Tour of Saturn's Icy Moons
Tuesday, 6 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1200h

The Cassini spacecraft captured new views and information on young, old, and oddball moons during the first year of a whirlwind tour of the Saturn system. The spacecraft returned breathtaking views and a deluge of data of these icy satellites during more than a dozen targeted flybys. In the midst of this multi-moon tour, scientists discovered that the moon Enceladus has an atmosphere, and it appears to be contributing particles to Saturn's massive E-ring. They also discovered a long, narrow ridge that lies almost exactly on the equator of Iapetus. In places, the ridge is approximately three times the height of Mt. Everest.

Participants:
Carolyn Porco, imaging team leader, Cassini-Huygens mission; Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
Julie Castillo, scientist, Cassini-Huygens mission, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA.

Session: P21F


A Tour of the Cryosphere: Earth's Frozen Assets
Tuesday, 6 December
MC Level 2, Room 20121400h

From shrinking Arctic sea ice to retreating glaciers and collapsing Antarctic ice shelves, the cryosphere is an important and ongoing news story. NASA satellites have captured these snow and ice changes worldwide to help scientists determine what is happening. A unique global view of these scientific issues is presented in the new NASA video "A Tour of the Cryosphere: Earth's Frozen Assets," which is being released at Fall Meeting. In a single take, the tour takes us around the world via state-of-the-art animations of the latest satellite data. The panelists will discuss new cryosphere research and how visualizations can be used to illustrate the science.

Participants:
Waleed Abdalati, Head, Cryospheric Sciences Branch, Hydrospheric and Biospheric Sciences Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
Michael Starobin, Senior Producer, NASA TV, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA.


GRACE Alters Our Understanding of Gravity
Tuesday, 6 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1500h

Three and a half years into its five-year primary mission to map Earth's changing gravity field with unsurpassed precision, NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) is generating exciting new research results that are changing our views on gravity and how variability in Earth's mass affects the balance of Earth's natural systems. This briefing covers three areas of note: 1) GRACE observations of how the Great Sumatra earthquake of 26 December 2004 affected Earth's gravity field and how those data may shed new light on earthquake physics and mechanisms; 2) the latest ice mass change measurements for Greenland, the only direct measurements currently available of ice mass; and 3) the seasonal transport variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the strongest current system in the world, which links the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific basins and significantly influences global climate.

Participants:
Michael Watkins, GRACE project scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA;
Byron Tapley, GRACE principal investigator, Center for Space Research, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA;
Isabella Velicogna, research scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Earth Science, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
Victor Zlotnicki, principal scientist in oceanography, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA.

Sessions: G22A/G23A


Past and Future Changes of Thermohaline Circulation
Wednesday, 7 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
0900h

Ocean circulation controls the climate and ecology of many regions of Earth. Particularly important is the thermohaline, or overturning, circulation in the North Atlantic. Evidence of abrupt changes in the past suggest its vulnerability now and in the future. Projections with climate models show a large uncertainty in its future response to warming and glacier melting. Is an abrupt collapse of the circulation, as depicted in the film, "The Day After Tomorrow," possible in the near future? This press conference reports on the most recent projections for the 21st century and beyond, including improved forecast methods and new evidence of past changes.

Participants
Andreas Schmittner, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA;
Didier Swingedouw, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement/IPSL, Orme des Merisiers, Gif-Sur-Yvette, France.

Candace O. Major, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA.

Sessions: OS33D, OS41A


Workshop on CALIPSO and CloudSat Satellites
Wednesday, 7 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1400h

NASA will soon launch two satellites that will answer questions about how clouds and aerosols (airborne particles) form, evolve, and affect water supply, climate, weather, and air quality. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), a joint U.S.-French project, will probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. CloudSat will use radar to study clouds and precipitation from space. Both satellites will be launched by the same rocket. This 45 minute workshop will provide the background science of clouds and aerosols with a new, 3-D perspective. Graeme Stephens will brief on the science of clouds and climate, and Charles Trepte will present the basics on aerosols and climate.

Participants: Charles R. Trepte, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, USA;
Graeme Stephens, Department of Atmospheric Research, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.


Glaciers Retreat in Alaska and Greenland--and Beyond
Wednesday, 7 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1500h

Large changes in glaciers have become an almost worldwide phenomenon. They can be particularly large where ice meets ocean water, that is, at temperate tidewater glaciers and at the outlet glaciers from the big ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. This session emphasizes such changes in Alaska and Greenland. The ice break up in these cases far exceeds what is possible due to surface melting alone, raising questions about the stability of ice sheets.

Participants:
William Krabill, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, USA;
Tad Pfeffer, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
Gordon Hamilton, Climate Change Institute, University of Maine, Orono, Maine, USA.

Session: C41A


Hurricane Katrina - The Mississippi Delta and its Future
Wednesday, 7 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1600h

Subsidence in the Mississippi Delta is a natural phenomenon and will continue into the future. Water and sediment loads are the main reasons; compaction and sea level rise are secondary reasons. Humans have exacerbated these natural phenomena through 1) gas and water extraction and 2) decreasing the input of sediment to the delta surface through levee controls and upstream reservoir trapping. The weight of New Orleans only increases the problem, one that is shared by 500 million people who live in megacities on the world's deltas. Fall Meeting provides scientists an opportunity to communicate easily with each other. For the Katrina-Rita reconstruction, there is, however, an urgent need for a mechanism by which scientists could communicate effectively with a more challenging audience, those in charge.

Participants:
Charles R. Groat, Professor of Geological Sciences and Director, Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA;
Gary Parker, Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Geology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA;
James P.M. Syvitski, Director, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), Professor of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA;
Mead Allison, Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Session: H42C


Hurricane Katrina - Next Steps for Scientists
Wednesday, 7 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1700h

A choir of social and physical scientists had predicted that one day, a hurricane would impact New Orleans as Katrinia did. Why were the warning' were not heeded, and what are the implications of scientists having been ignored? The insurance industry and local and federal officials have used catastrophe modeling technology for some time, which has provided many benefits. Nevertheless, far too many have ignored inherent weaknesses in the models or have been skeptical of their more extreme predictions. Instead, we confine our interpretations to what we are comfortable in accepting. Events of the past few years have provided scientists and officials alike an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate both the strengths and weaknesses of the model, as well as our own interpretations of the unlikely but not unusual. Some improvements to models have already been made, post-Katrina, but they must be improved on the national level to make therm more effective in influencing public behavior.

Participants:
Rick Luettich, Professor and Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina, Morehead City, North Carolina, USA;
Shirley Laska, Professor of Sociology. Director, Center for Hazards Assessment, Response and Technology (CHART), University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA;
Andrew Castaldi, Head, Catastrophe and Perils, Americas Division, Swiss Re, Armonk, New York, USA.

Session: U33C


Disaster Mitigation With Informatics
Thursday, 8 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
0900h

The devastation that followed the costly natural disasters of the past year has greatly increased the role of the geosciences in society. The Sumatra earthquake and tsunami and Hurricane Katrina highlight the need for developing and improving methods of Earth observing systems and processes. Information sharing, international cooperation, and developing cyberinfrastructure have become vital in efforts to better detect and analyze natural hazards. Panelists will discuss challenges associated with developing global Earth observation systems and increasing collaborative efforts across borders.

Participants:
John Orcutt, Deputy Director, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California; President, American Geophysical Union.
Other participants TBD

Session: IN43C


STEREO Workshop for Science Writers
Thursday, 8 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1000h

When the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) launches in Spring 2006, scientists expect to gain a better understanding of space weather and improve warning time for the massive solar storms that can harm astronauts, satellites, communication systems, and even electric power grids on Earth. Our current two-dimensional view makes it difficult to predict the direction of solar events. The two STEREO spacecraft will image the Sun and its explosions in high definition 3-D for the first time. In this Writer's Workshop, reporters will learn about space weather and STEREO's 3-D mission and can ask questions of experts on the latest advances in the field.

Participants:
Michael Kaiser, STEREO Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
Dr. Janet Luhmann, STEREO/IMPACT Principal Investigator, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA;
Dr. Madhulika Guhathakurta, STEREO Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA;
Nicholas Chrissotimos, STEREO Project Manager, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA.


Aura Satellite Tracks Earth's Air Quality, Global Cloud Ice
Thursday, 8 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1100h

Local and regional air pollution and their sources can now be closely watched from space. Researchers using the latest data from NASA's Aura satellite report on close tracking of important pollutants, including ozone and nitrogen dioxide. In addition, the first global observations of ice in clouds are shown to be important in reducing uncertainties in predictions of future climate change. The role of these new tools for air quality and climate forecasts will be discussed.

Participants:
Anne R. Douglass, Aura Deputy Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
Pieternel F. Levelt, Principal Investigator, Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, The Netherlands; Duane E. Waliser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Pasadena, California, USA;
Daniel Jacob, Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Division of Engineering and Applied Science, and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Session: A41A


Suburban Crises They Don't Touch on "Desperate Housewives"
Thursday, 8 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1300h

Suburbanization--often characterized by low-to-moderate population densities, green lawns, and roads--is one of the fastest growing land uses in the U.S. While we have studied environmental conditions in our cities and in our rural areas, much less is known about environmental change in suburban landscapes. Emerging research reveals patterns and processes with important environmental and management implications. For example, suburban lawns, the pride of many homeowners, store carbon and nitrogen, impacting the net national contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions. Management of stormwater runoff continues to be a critical challenge and ultimately will require innovative strategies, not only at the watershed scale but also at the backyard scale. Suburban geophysical science reveals an ecological infrastructure even more complex than the weekly doings on Wisteria Lane.

Participants:
Jennifer Jenkins, Research Assistant Professor, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA;
Lawrence Band, Voit Gilmore Distinguished Professor, Department of Geography, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA;
William Bowden, Patrick Professor of Watershed Science and Planning; Director, Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA.

Sessions: B43C


A Tour of the Cryosphere: Earth's Frozen Assets [REPEAT]
Thursday, 6 December
MC Level 2, Room 2012
1400h

[This is a repeat of the press conference held Tuesday at 1400h. Reporters who could not attend the first screening are invited, as will be some scientists attending Fall Meeting.] From shrinking Arctic sea ice to retreating glaciers and collapsing Antarctic ice shelves, the cryosphere is an important and ongoing news story. NASA satellites have captured these snow and ice changes worldwide to help scientists determine what is happening. A unique global view of these scientific issues is presented in the new NASA video "A Tour of the Cryosphere: Earth's Frozen Assets," which is being released at Fall Meeting. In a single take, the tour takes us around the world via state-of-the-art animations of the latest satellite data. The panelists will discuss new cryosphere research and how visualizations can be used to illustrate the science.

Participants:
Waleed Abdalati, Head, Cryospheric Sciences Branch, Hydrospheric and Biospheric Sciences Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA;
Michael Starobin, Senior Producer, NASA TV, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA.


2. Attention PIOs: Sending press releases to Fall Meeting

Public information officers of universities, government agencies, and research institutions are encouraged to send press releases and related documentation to Fall Meeting. We recommend around 50 copies of printed materials and three-to-five copies of broadcast quality videotapes (Beta format).

The easiest way to get these materials to the Press Room is to take them yourself, if you are going, or to give them to one of your scientists, with instructions to deliver them to Room 2024 Moscone West, anytime after Monday, 5 December, at 0730h.

If you prefer, you may send these materials by FedEx, UPS, or DHL to the following address:

Harvey Leifert - AGU Press Office (Room 2024)
AGU Fall Meeting
Moscone West
800 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

Phone: 415-348-4440

Express shipments to the above address should be times to arrive on Friday, 2 December, or after. They will be displayed as soon as received.

Remaining materials may be collected from Room 2024 on Friday, 9 December, at 1300h, after which they will be scrapped.


3. Field trip itinerary

Following is the "final" itinerary for the 4 December field trip, pegged to the upcoming centennial of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The trip will take place rain or shine. The itinerary below is subject to modification, due to weather, road conditions, availability of briefers, or other reasons. Any changes will be announced during the field trip.


0745h-0815h
Moscone West Convention Center, 800 Howard Street, at corner of Fourth Street.
Assemble, distribute guidebooks, and load bus for prompt departure.
Note: at 0800h, those on the Confirmed List who have not yet checked in will be treated as Wait Listed, along with those already on the Wait List. We will depart promptly.

0815h Leave Moscone West

0845h-0925h
Stop 1 - Twin Peaks
Overview of San Francisco area: the impact of the 1906 earthquake; other Bay Area faults and the probability of future earthquakes and their impacts on the dense population and infrastructure. Discussion of 1906 ground motion simulations and San Francisco's unique seismic vulnerability assessment (CAPSS, Citizen's Action Plan for Seismic Safety). This study was cancelled by the City when preliminary results came out indicating devastating losses to housing. Briefers: Mary Lou Zoback, Jack Boatwright, David Schwartz (all U.S. Geological Survey)


(Plan B - if Twin Peaks is covered in fog or clouds)
Stop 1, Randall Museum in Corona Heights
Same content as above.


0955h-1035h
Stop 2 - Marina District, corner of Divisadero & North Point Streets
Focus of extensive damage in 1989 quake in area of fill, beginning in 1860's. A highly desirable residential neighborhood, this area shook 7-10 times more than surrounding areas in 1989. At this corner one house tilted 18 inches [46 centimeters] from vertical and was since righted, one corner house collapsed and burned (as did its neighbors) and a third corner house completely collapsed. The 1860's shoreline runs right through the intersection.
Briefers: Jack Boatwright, Mary Lou Zoback, USGS

1130h-1230h
Stop 3 - Offset fence and row of trees on San Andreas Fault in the San Francisco Watershed
We visit (on SF Water District land) a section of the San Andreas fault where a fence and row of trees, offset in 1906, are still preserved. Discussion of the impact of future Bay Area quakes on water delivery in the Bay Area.
Note: this visit involves a walk downhill, and then back uphill, on a gravel road. Wear appropriate footgear.
Briefers: Carol Prentice, Research geologist, USGS; Greg Bartow, Geologist and Groundwater manager, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.

1305h-1325h
Stop 4 - Westborough Boulevard
Urban San Andreas: discussion of the impact of pre-Alquist-Priolo Act development.
Briefer: Carol Prentice, USGS

1325h-1400h
Drive to East Bay via Bay Bridge. Box lunches provided, and eaten, en route.
Discussion en route of hazards in the East Bay area.
Briefers: David Schwartz and Jack Boatwright, USGS

1400h-1500h
Stop 5 - Oakland Office of Emergency Services (OES), Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
Continued discussion of hazards in the East Bay and plans to mitigate them.
Briefer: Colleen Bell, Emergency Planning Coordinator, OES

1515h-1615h
Stop 6 - SF Bay Bridge, Caltrans Public Information Center
Design and construction of new east span of the Bay Bridge, to replace the one that failed in part in the 1989 earthquake.
Briefer: Bart Ney, Division of Engineering Services, Structure Construction, Caltrans

1615h
Depart Caltrans via Bay Bridge.

1645h
Arrive Moscone West
End of field trip.


Those currently Confirmed and on the Wait List are noted in Who's Coming (Item 6, below). We anticipate clearing several Wait Listed people in the coming days, and they will be so notified. Those still on the Wait List on 4 December are encouraged to arrive at the starting point prior to 0800h, to be eligible to take the place of any no-shows.

If you are confirmed and your plans change so that you cannot participate, please inform Harvey Leifert as soon as possible.

Reminder: The trip will take place rain or shine, but if it rains or has recently rained, some areas may be muddy. Please wear appropriate shoes or boots and take a raincoat or poncho, etc., as well as an umbrella.

Lunch: We will provide box lunches to be eaten en route, as noted in the itinerary. Those who are confirmed, as well as those on the wait list, who have special dietary needs should advise Harvey Leifert as soon as possible.


4. News Media registration information

News Media registrants receive a badge that provides access to any of the scientific sessions of the meeting, as well as to the Press Room and Briefing Room. No one will be admitted without a valid badge.

New: This year, News Media registrants who have preregistered will pick up their badges at a special window or kiosk in the main registration area on Level 1 (street level), not in the Press Room on Level 2, as in the past. Be prepared to show identification (see below).

If you have not preregistered, you may fill out a News Media Registration Form, available at the News Media window, presenting appropriate identification. Your badge will be made on site.

No one will be allowed into the Exhibition Hall (Level 1) or up the escalators or elevator to Levels 2 and 3 without a badge.

Eligibility for press registration is limited to the following persons:

  • Working press employed by bona fide news media: must present a press card, business card, or letter of introduction from an editor of a recognized publication.
  • Freelance science writers: must present a current membership card from NASW, a regional affiliate of NASW, CSWA, ISWA, or SEJ; or evidence of by-lined work pertaining to science intended for the general public and published in 2004 or 2005; or a letter from the editor of a recognized publication assigning you to cover Fall Meeting.
  • Public information officers of scientific societies, educational institutions, and government agencies: must present a business card.
Note: Representatives of publishing houses, for-profit corporations, and the business side of news media must register at the main registration desk at the meeting and pay the appropriate fees, regardless of possession of any of the above documents. They are not accredited as Press at the meeting.

Scientists who are also reporters and who are presenting at this meeting (oral or poster session) may receive News Media credentials if they qualify (see above), but must also register for the meeting and pay the appropriate fee as a presenter.


5. News Media Registration Form

The News Media Registration Form is set up for online submission, but includes a link to a version that can be printed out and faxed or mailed. Go to: http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm05/?pageRequest=press_reg

The last day for advance News Media registration, assuring that your badge will be waiting for you when you arrive, is Friday, 25 November 2005. You may also register onsite at the News Media booth in the Registration area on Level 1 (street level).


6. Who's coming

The following persons have registered as of the date of this message. If you have submitted a registration form, but your name does not appear below, please resubmit the form (Item 5, above).

Field trip: In the list, "Yes" means the person is confirmed for the 4 December field trip. "*Yes" means confirmed, but not using the bus. "Wait List" is self-explanatory.

Aguilera Mario Scripps Inst. of Oceanography Yes
Amos Jonathan BBC News Interactive Yes
Alden Andrew About.com
Anatta UCAR
Baker Joanne Science
Barrales Amelia U.S. Geological Survey
Bela James Freelance Wait List
Bentley Molly BBC World Service Yes
Blumenberg Sue NASA Ames Research Center Yes
Borok Lisa MBARI Wait List
Bortman Henry Astrobiology Magazine
Branson Kenneth Rutgers University Wait List
Brusa Doug Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Burnham Robert Mars Space Flight Facility, ASU
Calamai Peter Toronto Star Yes
Castelvecchi Davide American Institute of Physicss Wait List
Chamberlain Ted National Geographic News Yes
Chang Alicia Associated Press Yes
Chang Kenneth The New York Times Yes
Chanut Francoise California Wild
Chui Glennda San Jose Mercury News Yes
Clark Cindy Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
Cole Steve NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr.
Connor Steve The Independent (London) Yes
Cowen Robert Christian Science Monitor Yes
Cox John Freelance
Cunningham Ann Marie TalkingScience
Cutler Kevin California Wild
den Hond Bas Trouw
DeWitt Sarah NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr.
Doherty Paul Exploratorium Yes
Donaldson Leslie KTVU-TV Oakland *Yes
Dybas Cheryl National Science Foundation
Elgart Jennings Joanne NewsHour with Jim Lehrer Yes
Epatko Larisa Online NewsHour with Jim Lehrer Yes
Fell Andy UC Davis News Service
Field Richard Richfield Productions
Fraknoi Andrew Freelance
Fromme Alison Freelance
Fulton-Bennett Kim MBARI Wait List
Gebhart Fred Drug Topics Magazine
Gordon Leslie U.S. Geological Survey *Yes
Greensfelder Liese Freelance
Hall Carl San Francisco Chronicle
Hand Eric St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Hanna Raven Freelance Yes
Hanna Stephanie U.S. Geological Survey Yes
Hanson Brooks Science
Henson Bob UCAR Yes
Hicks Johnson Tara SOEST - University of Hawaii
Hill Richard The Oregonian
Hoffman Sarah Corvallis Gazette-Times Yes
Horn Bob K PIX-TV - CBS News
Inman Mason Freelance
Irion Robert ScienceNow
Johnson Christina California Sea Grant - UCSD
Kerr Dick Science
Kloeppel Jim U. Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Yes
Kostel Ken Earth Institute at Columbia Univ.
Kusek Kristen The Marine Scientist
LaFee Scott San Diego Union-Tribune Yes
Lakdawalla Emily The Planetary Society
LaMacchia Diane Earth Images Foundation
Lau Edie Sacramento Bee Yes
Leake Jonathan Sunday Times (London) Yes
Levy Dawn Stanford News Service Yes
Light Nancy Integrated Ocean Drilling Program
Ling Frank KALX-FM Berkeley
Lloyd Erica Freelance
Lorditch Emilie Discoveries & Breakthroughs
Lorentz Katie NASA Langley Research Center
Lovett Rick Freelance Yes
Lubick Naomi Geotimes Yes
Marks Robin Exploratorium Wait List
Marshall Jessica New Scientist Yes
Martinez Carolina NASAP Jet Propulsion Laboratory
McDowell Susanne UCSC Science Writing Program Wait List
McFarling Usha Lee Los Angeles Times Yes
McKeeking Gavin AGU/AAAS Mass Media Fellow
McKinnon Mika SPS Observer Wait List
McLeish Todd University of Rhode Island
Mejia Robin Freelance Wait List
Melo Niels Richfield Productions
Miller Ryder Freelance
Molnia Bruce Freelance *Yes
Monastersky Richard Chronicle of Higher Education
Nash J. Madeleine Time Yes
Null Jan Freelance
O'Hanlon Larry Discovery Channel Online
Pease Roland BBC Radio Science Unit Yes
Perkins Sid Science News Yes
Petit Charles Freelance
Pinckard Anne UCSC Science Writing Program
Powell Hugh Oceanus Magazine
Pratt Sara Freelance/Geotimes Yes
Prose Doug Earth Images Foundation
Rademacher Horst Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Yes
Ravilious Kate The Guardian Yes
Reed Christina Freelance Yes
Rehmeyer Julie UCSC Science Writing Program Wait List
Reilly Michael Freelance Wait List
Renfrow Stephanie National Snow & Ice Data Center
Reynolds Bob Richfield Productions
Rink Chris NASA Langley Research Center
Robertson Donald Astronomy Now Yes
Rogers Adam Wired
Rosenthal Anne Freelance Yes
Rowan Linda Geotimes Yes
Russomanno Tony KPIX-TV - CBS News
Saarman Emily UCSC Science Writing Program
Sasso Anne Freelance Yes
Scafetta Andrew Discovery Channel
Shea Tammy Discovery Channel
Shekhar Chandra UCSC Science Writing Program Wait List
Showstack Randy Eos
Shwartz Mark Stanford News Service Wait List
Smith Jesse Science
Sperling Norm Journal of Irreproducible Results
Stahler Alan KVMR-FM Nevada City Yes
Starobin Michael NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr.
Strong-Aufhauser Lisa Strong Mountain Productions Wait List
Sullivant Rosemary NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Swimmer Jeff Creative Differences/History Channel
Vance Erik UCSC Science Writing Program
VanDecar John Nature Yes
Villard Ray Space Telescope Science Institute
Wakefield Julie Freelance
Weintraub Rachel NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr.
Wilson Elizabeth Chemical & Engineering News Wait List
Witze Alexandra Nature
Wong Kathleen California Wild
Wright Matthew Carnegie Institution of Washington
Wyckoff Barbara National Geographic Magazine Yes
Young Byron KVMR-FM Nevada City Wait List
Zala Krista UCSC Science Writing Program Wait List

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

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