Eat more tuna or less?

10/19/05

Public health group urges women not to overreact on fish

Washington, DC; October 20, 2005 Eat more fish or eat less? To answer this question for the public and especially women, the National Women's Health Resource Center will hold a major press conference on October 26 in Washington that for the first time, summarizes the range of new studies focusing on the risks and benefits of seafood consumption. Of key significance, the press conference will showcase the results of a five-part study conducted by the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, which finds that that if Americans reduce their fish consumption, there may be serious public health consequences, such as an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

At the same time, the press conference will address new survey data showing there has been a decline in fish consumption and will announce a national "teach in" for women so that they will be able to make their seafood decisions based on fact and not fear.

The following summarizes the details of this major press event:

WHO: Amy Niles, President of the National Women's Health Resource Center, who will relay new survey data showing the public needs more education on the real risks and benefits of fish consumption.

Joshua Cohen, Senior research associate at the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis and the lead author of the new study which finds that if the public reduces or eliminates fish consumption based on risk concerns alone, they will lose a number of well-established health benefits.

Joyce Nettleton, D.Sc., R.D, author of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Health who will summarize the range of studies showing the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids across the lifespan.

WHAT: Press conference to address public confusion about the risks and benefits of seafood consumption based on the findings of important new scientific findings.

WHEN: Wednesday, October 26, 2005 10 a.m. EDT

WHERE: The National Press Club, 529 14th Street, NW
The Murrow Room
Washington, DC

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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