AAN Foundation, National MS Society partner for Clinician Scientist Development Award

08/29/05

First award to focus on Optical nerve and retina in MS

ST. PAUL, Minn. In collaboration with the National MS Society, the American Academy of Neurology Foundation has provided the first Clinician Scientist Development Award to support research in multiple sclerosis (MS). Ari J. Green, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco is the recipient for 2005.

The Clinician Scientist Development Award will grant $75,000 per year for two years to Dr. Green who will focus on the inner retina and optic nerve as possible windows to measure nerve fiber damage. People with MS frequently develop inflammation of the optic nerve which can lead to blurring, vision loss, and painful eye movements.

MS is an autoimmune disease that affects the central nervous system. It is characterized by numbness or tingling, weakness, or unsteady walking. The average age of diagnosis is 30. MS tends to affect women more than men.

Dr. Green will use a new noninvasive technology called optical coherence tomography to evaluate the structure of the nerve fibers in the optic nerve and retina in people with MS. Observing early changes in the retina may allow researchers to predict other types of disability in people with MS.

"Dr. Green had a very strong application," said Austin J. Sumner, MD, acting chair of the AAN Foundation. "We hope this award makes a significant contribution to our understanding of MS."

Applications are now sought for the next Clinician Scientist Development Award. Applicants must be at the PGY4 or PGY5 stage of an accredited residency program and licensed to practice medicine in the United States. The award has a mentored approach where the applicant must arrange a proposed training program with an appropriate mentor and institution prior to submitting an application.

Award applications are due February 11, 2006. The recipient will be notified in June 2006.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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