Queensland to be hub of Australasian kidney network

07/13/05

The growing problem of kidney disease will be tackled head on with the formation of a new Queensland-based research network.

To be co-ordinated through The University of Queensland's Queensland Clinical Trials Centre at the Princess Alexandra Hospital, the $1.29 million Australasian Kidney Trials Network (AKTN) will aim to improve the health and quality of life of people suffering from kidney disease.

Associate Professor Carmel Hawley, Chair of the Brisbane-based Operations Secretariat of the Network, said the AKTN would draw together leading researchers in kidney disease from around Australia and New Zealand.

"Kidney disease is one biggest health issues facing Australia at the moment along with heart disease and diabetes," Dr Hawley said.

"It affect one in seven Australian adults and there are 1.7 million people with moderate to severe chronic kidney disease.

"This Network will be focused on new and innovative clinical research to provide better treatments and outcomes for patients.

"We already have 10 trials submitted to the network researching varying treatments for chronic kidney diseases such as dialysis and transplants."

Dr Hawley said kidney disease affected one in seven Australian adults, with 1.7 million people with moderate to severe chronic kidney disease.

Other UQ researchers involved in the Network include Elaine Beller from the School of Population Health and Professors David Johnson and Wendy Hoy from the School of Medicine.

Dr Hawley said this focus on treatment and prevention trials was unique in Australia and would be a new approach to the varying renal diseases.

"The Network will be at the forefront of knowledge creation and address complex economic, technological and social needs relating to the patient care and the translation of research into clinical practice," she said.

The AKTN is the recipient of an National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Enabling Grant worth $1.29 million over five years.

The NHMRC Enabling Grants scheme is designed to strengthen the research base in particular areas and is intended to assist Australian researchers to continue high quality, world-class research by providing support for specific facilities and activities to enhance the national health and medical research effort.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

The greater the difficulty, the more glory in surmounting it. Skillful pilots gain their reputation from storms and tempests.
~ Epictetus