University of Minnesota to host international whole grains conference

05/05/05

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (May 2, 2005) --Lester Crawford, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, will join whole grain researchers, manufacturers, educators and regulators from around the globe as they meet May 18-20 in the Radisson Plaza Hotel, Minneapolis, to develop a research agenda and action plan for including more whole grains in peoples' diets. Hosted by the University of Minnesota, "Whole Grains & Health: A Global Summit" will examine the latest data on whole grains and health in an effort to shape consumption patterns and encourage people to eat more foods made from whole grains.

In January the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommended that Americans eat at least three servings of whole grains per day. This is the first time a specific whole grains recommendation has been added to the food pyramid.

"Studies have linked whole grain consumption to reduced risk of heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer. The problem is, many people don't like the taste of whole grain products," said conference organizer Len Marquart, assistant professor of food science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota. "Industry, academia and government need to work together to ensure that tasty and nutritious whole grain products are available to everyone."

The conference is organized around several topics, including "Whole Grains in Diabetes, Obesity, Heart Disease and Cancer," "Health Effects of Whole Grain Components" and "Whole Grains Consumer Issues." Crawford will speak on "A Government Perspective of Whole Grains" at 8:10 a.m. Friday, May 20.

To register, visit http://www.wholegrain.umn.edu/conference. To view a complete schedule of conference activities, visit http://www.wholegrain.umn.edu/conference/index.cfm or call Lori Engstrom at (612) 624-2792. The Radisson Plaza Hotel is located at 35 S. Seventh St., Minneapolis.

Source: Eurekalert & others

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