NNii media advisory about David Kirby's book questioning vaccine safety

04/01/05

'Evidence of Harm: Mercury in Vaccines and the Autism Epidemic: A Medical Controversy'

Reporter David Kirby has recently written a book, "Evidence of Harm: Mercury in Vaccines and the Autism Epidemic: A Medical Controversy," purporting that there is a link between thimerosal and autism and other developmental disorders. This book (for release in April, 2005-St. Martin's Press) is being marketed aggressively. Publicity surrounding the release of this book has the potential to confuse families who are asking appropriate questions about vaccine safety. The National Network for Immunization Information (NNii) offers the following perspective:

  • Extensive evidence shows no link between vaccines and neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. This evidence is based on well-established scientific studies.

  • Continued attempts to link vaccines and autism run the risk of diverting attention away from efforts to understand the cause or causes of autism.

  • Immunization remains one of the most important things parents can do to protect their children from serious infectious diseases.

    The NNii media office has available scientific experts to discuss these issues. Contact Diana Olson at 703-299-0201 to schedule an interview.

    The National Network for Immunization Information (NNii) provides up-to-date, science based information about immunizations to health professionals, the public, policymakers, and the media. NNii is based at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and is affiliated with the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Nurses Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

    Source: Eurekalert & others

    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
        Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

     

     

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