Executive director Marcus Milling receives Pick and Gavel Award

04/05/05

AGI's executive director awarded AASG's prestigious honor

ALEXANDRIA, VA The American Geological Institute's (AGI) Executive Director, Marcus Milling, was awarded the prestigious Association of American State Geologist's (AASG) Pick and Gavel Award. Commissioned by the members of AASG, the Pick and Gavel Award is presented to recognize individuals who have made significant contributions to advancing the role of geoscience in public policy and who have supported AASG's mission in government affairs.

Dr. Marcus Milling was chosen as this year's recipient for his tireless efforts to unite the geoscience community on issues of information, education and public policy. William Fisher of the Jackson School of Geoscience, presented the award saying that Dr. Milling's experience, vision and energy has made valuable contributions in research, management and leadership in the corporate and public worlds.

After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa, Dr. Milling worked as a research geologist in the petroleum industry and later as Associate Director at the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. He joined AGI as Executive Director in 1992. "He proved to be the right person at the right time," said Fisher, a long-time friend and colleague. "He put forth a tremendous effort in forging AGI into a major professional voice." Dr. Milling has been the initiator of many AGI projects and programs including the effort to preserve important geological data and creating the AGI Congressional Fellowship (named for William Fisher) that support geoscientists to work for a year in Congress with a member or committee.

Past awardees include Senators Harry Reid and Pete Domenici (2004), Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton (2002) and National Science Foundation Director Rita Colwell (2000).

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