Massive weight loss conference Dallas April 1-2

03/23/05

Plastic surgeons and bariatric surgeons discuss obesity, massive weight loss and body contouring treatments

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. – While massive weight loss surgery is increasingly becoming the treatment of choice for the morbidly obese, many patients are unaware that additional plastic surgery – body contouring – will likely be necessary to achieve their desired body shape. Body contouring following massive weight loss will be the focus of a conference sponsored by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) in Dallas, April 1 – 2, at the Fairmont Hotel.

The conference, Body Contouring After Massive Weight Loss, is open to physicians and the media. The ASPS/ASAPS meeting will address the status of obesity in the United States, advances in bariatric medicine, innovations in plastic surgery procedures after massive weight loss, the psychological impact of major weight loss, treatment options, expectation management and patient safety considerations for this patient population.

In the United States, obesity has risen at an epidemic rate during the past 20 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Results of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2000 indicate that an estimated 64 percent of U.S. adults are either overweight or obese.

More than 106,000 body contouring procedures were performed in 2004, up 77 percent over the last five years according to the ASPS. Massive weight loss patients, who accounted for nearly 56,000 procedures, continue to drive the growth in body contouring. In 2004, more than 98,000 breast lifts, 5,900 buttock lifts, 15,000 lower body lifts, 13,000 thigh lifts and 17,000 upper arm lifts were performed, according to ASAPS.

Source: Eurekalert & others

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Feb 2009
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